AGENDA

 

Vincent Community Board Meeting

Tuesday, 2 March 2021

Date:

Tuesday, 2 March 2021

Time:

2.00 pm

Location:

Ngā Hau e Whā, William Fraser Building,

1 Dunorling Street, Alexandra

Sanchia Jacobs

Chief Executive Officer

 


Vincent Community Board Agenda

2 March 2021

 

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Vincent Community Board will be held in Ngā Hau e Whā, William Fraser Building, 1 Dunorling Street, Alexandra on
Tuesday, 2 March 2021 at 2.00 pm

Order Of Business

1          Apologies. 5

2          Public Forum.. 5

3          Confirmation of Minutes. 10

Vincent Community Board meeting Meeting - 19 January 2021. 11

4          Declaration of Interest 19

21.2.1            Declarations of Interest Register 19

5          Reports for Decisions. 23

21.2.2            Draft Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan 2021. 23

21.2.3            Fees and Charges 2021-22 Schedule. 119

6          Reports for Information. 151

21.2.4            Vincent Financial Report - Period Ending 31 December 2020. 151

21.2.5            Alexandra Pool Energy Consumption. 156

21.2.6            Pool Operating Costs. 164

7          Mayor’s Report 168

8          Chair's Report 169

21.2.7            Chair's Report 169

9          Members' Reports. 170

21.2.8            Members' Reports. 170

10       Status Reports. 171

21.2.9            Governance Report 171

11       Date of the Next Meeting. 189

12       Resolution to Exclude the Public. 190

21.2.10         Clyde Museum Redevelopment Project and the District Museum Strategy. 190

21.2.11         Confidential Governance Report 190

 

 


Members           Cr M McPherson (Chairperson), Mr R Garbutt (Deputy Chair), Dr R Browne, Cr L Claridge, Cr I Cooney, Ms A Robinson, Ms S Stirling-Lindsay

In Attendance  T Cadogan (Mayor), S Jacobs (Chief Executive Officer), L Macdonald (Executive Manager - Corporate Services), J Muir (Executive Manager - Infrastructure Services), L van der Voort (Executive Manager - Planning and Environment), S Righarts (Chief Advisor), R Williams (Governance Manager), W McEnteer (Governance Support Officer)

 

1                 Apologies

2                 Public Forum

Senior Sargeant Clinton Wright – Police Report

Julie Howard and Roy Noble – Transpower

Bill Siddells – Central Cinemas and Brian Budd – Central Stories (see attached letter below)


 

Central Cinema Inc

21 Centennial Av,

Alexandra.

Central Stories,

21 Centennial Av,

Alexandra.

 

Sunday 21 February 2021.

To -

 

Christina Martin

Property and Facilities Officer

Vincent Community Board

Central Otago District Council

Box 122

Alexandra 9340

 

Wayne McEnteer

Governance Support Officer

Vincent Community Board

Central Otago District Council

Box 122

Alexandra 9340

 

 

 

 

Dear Christina and Wayne -

 

Request for VCB Letter of Support

for proposed Central Stories Meeting Room/Box Office upgrade

 

 

Introduction.

 

This is a joint letter from Central Cinema Inc (CCI) and Alexandra District Museum Inc (ADMI).

 

With the respective CODC agreements for the use of Central Stories signed off with CCI and ADMI in Sept 2020 it is now time to consider upgrading the Meeting Room and Box Office in Central Stories.

 

Could you please place this letter on the 2 March VCB Agenda for their consideration. 

 

And Wayne, could you register my and Brian's wish to be present at the Public Forum to answer any questions VCB Members may have.

 

The Case for upgrade.

 

 You will be aware of both organisations' long standing concerns regarding the fitness for purpose of Central Stories' Meeting Room and Box Office's furniture, fittings, lighting and overall ambience  

 

CCI - 

 

For CCI this concern relates to our ability to create a warm and welcoming 'Come. Stay. Play' environment which invites patrons to come early to socialise, drink, and eat a light snack, watch a film, then stay after for further socialisation.

 

This is reinforced by inflexible meeting-room-type furniture, the lack of comfortable lounge-type furniture (eg armchairs,  sofas, & side tables), harsh overhead lighting, and an unappealing Box Office made up of disparate pieces of furniture and fridge/freezer equipment which is not conducive to serving quality cabinet food or receiving patrons in a professional setting.

 

However, we (like ADMI) also want to use the Meeting Room as a Meeting Room.

 

And we believe a more flexible and attractive environment will encourage more use of the Meeting Room by other groups and agencies.

 

So we are wanting the upgraded assets to be quickly and easily changable from a Meeting Room format to Lounge format and back again depending on the needs of the Hirer.

 

This concern was reinforced by our 2018 Survey of 86 respondents, 58% of whom rated the Entrance and Ticketing Area as 'Below Average' (14%) or 'Average' (44%), a total of 58%.

 

ADMI - 

 

ADMI shares many of the above concerns, including the inflexibility of the existing space for a variety of meetings and other activities that could take place in this room eg. Children's Holiday Workshops.  

 

Additionally, they would like the current Meeting Room tables to be foldable (for easy storage in the Green Room when not needed) and more easily moved (eg on wheels), and to be able to move Meeting Room lounge furniture through to the Museum foyer for functions.

 

Others' concerns -

 

But these are not just our concerns. 

 

These concerns have also been captured in two CODC Reports which VCB will be aware of.

 

1. 'Central Stories Feasibility Study...' (aka McElrea Report) (Jan 2018) - there were 1,500 responses to this consultation. Page 54 states: 

'..Meeting Room/Cinema entrance -

# 'The entrance to the Cinema currently has no ambience or Cinema goer quality about it. Visitors to the cinema walk through a meeting room space... 

# [Cinema] needs to have a more welcoming, cinematic experience. Suggestions included refurbishing the meeting room to ...create a lounge-type experience... 

# Central Cinema Inc have indicated that they have some financial reserves available that [along with fund raising] they would be willing to put into the room's upgraded furniture and fittings if that is the way CODC decided to go'

 

The 'Business Case for Central Stories Building' (aka 'Better Business Case') - this Dec 2019 Report recommending a 'Single cultural hub' has not yet been accepted by CODC/VCB, and that recommendation will not appear in the next LTP document. 

We recognise it could be several years before CODC/VCB is in a position to move forward with any actions in relation to this Report.  In the meantime CCI and ADMI wish to undertake non-structural improvements to the Meeting Room and Box Office which will improve its usability and ambience

 

P 213 states -

# '[The Cinema plays an important role] in attracting local community patronage. Stakeholders considered [it] had a good fit with the overall Central Stories purpose and needed to be included in the facility'

# '...the foyer area is basic and unattractive". There is a need to make the area more welcoming and comfortable, as well as to include permanent ticket facilities and access to refreshments...at least matching the Clyde cinema experience.'

 

The Request to VCB.

 

That it issue a 'Letter of Support in Principle' to CCI and ADMI, to be used when either or both organisation(s) approach Funders for potential funding.

 

Points to note.

 

·         We anticipate this upgrade could cost up to $15,000 and funding support would be sought from local funding organisations. 

·         We are not seeking funding from the CODC/VCB for this upgrade. 

·         The ownership of the upgraded assets would be shared between CCI and ADMI. 

·         The proposed new assets would be available without additional charge to any Meeting Room user.   

·         We are not presenting specific upgrade ideas regarding furniture, fittings and lighting at this stage; that work will come after a Letter of Support is received, and will require CCI, ADMI and CODC/VCB input.

 

Summary.

 

The proposed upgrade offers -

·         More flexibility in the use of the Meeting Room which could result in more usage beyond just CCI and ADMI.

·         Enhanced ambience in the Meeting Room encouraging people to ‘Come. Play. Stay’

·         Improved kitchen equipment – e.g. dishwasher and fridge.

·         No cost to VCB or CODC.

·         Only non-structural assets would be upgraded.

 

Feel free to contact Bill or Brian if you need further information. 

 

Regards 

 

 

 

Bill Siddells

Chair, 

Central Cinema Inc.

bill.siddells@gmail.com

021 708 002.

 

Brian Budd,

Manager, 

Central Stories,

manager@centralstories.com

03 448 6230

 

 

 

 


 

3                 Confirmation of Minutes

Vincent Community Board meeting - 19 January 2021


Vincent Community Board Agenda

2 March 2021

 

MINUTES OF A mEETING OF THE
Vincent Community Board
HELD IN
Ngā Hau e Whā, William Fraser Building, 1 Dunorling Street, Alexandra
ON
Tuesday, 19 January 2021 COMMENCING AT 2.00 pm

 

PRESENT:              Cr M McPherson, Mr R Garbutt, Dr R Browne, Cr I Cooney, Ms S Stirling-Lindsay

IN ATTENDANCE: T Cadogan (Mayor), L van der Voort (Acting Chief Executive Officer), L Macdonald (Executive Manager - Corporate Services), J Kasibante (Finance Manager), M Gordon (Parks Officer – Projects), L Stronach (Property Officer – Statutory), M Adamson (Policy Advisor), N Aaron (Community Development Officer), F Somerville (Roading Administration Assistant) and W McEnteer (Governance Support Officer)

 

1                 Apologies

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Browne

That apologies from Cr L Claridge and Ms A Robinson be received and accepted.

Carried

 

2                 Public Forum

Julie Howard (Stakeholder Engagement Manager), Roy Noble (Project Director) and Kate Mandis (Environmental Planner) (Transpower - Clutha / Upper Waitaki Project)

 

Representatives from Transpower gave an update on activities on the Clutha / Upper Waitaki Lines Project. They reported that work on the Cromwell to Twizel line had been completed. They were currently working on the lines from Earnscleugh to Roxburgh and a number of safety barriers above the roads were currently being erected between Alexandra and Roxburgh. They discussed the next part of the project and noted that some sections of work on the lines between Earnscleugh and Galloway would be purposefully delayed so as not to interfere with lambing. They then responded to questions from the Board.   

 

 

Graye Shattky

 

Mr Shattky spoke to the proposed redevelopment of the Clyde museum. He noted that money had been set aside for concept plans, and queried whether that money would be spent now or when a district wide sector review was completed. He also asked that in light of architectural services being sort for the Clyde Museum, would the views of stakeholders be taken into consideration. Mr Shattky then responded to questions from the Board.

 

 

3                 Confirmation of Minutes

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               Garbutt

Seconded:          Cooney

That the public minutes of the Vincent Community Board meeting held on 3 November 2020 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

 

4                 Declaration of Interest

 

Members were reminded of their obligations in respect of declaring any interests. Mr Garbutt declared that he was now a committee member of the Dunstan Golf Club.

 

 

5                 Reports for Decisions

 

 

Note: Mr Mark Brown from Boffa Miskell Limited joined the meeting via video link for item 21.1.2.

 

21.1.2         Clyde Cemetery Development Plan

A report from the Parks Officer – Projects to consider the Clyde Cemetery Development Plan had been circulated.

Mr Brown gave a brief presentation discussing the current conditions at the Clyde cemetery and  the potential development plan for the cemetery in Clyde as outlined in the appendix to the report. He then responded to questions from the Board.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               Cooney

Seconded:          Stirling-Lindsay

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Approves the Clyde Cemetery Development Plan.

C.      Notes that the draft 2021 – 2031 Long Term Plan provides for the developed design and costing phases for plan implementation in future years.

Carried

 

21.1.3         Application for easement in favour of Aurora Energy Limited

A report from the Property Officer - Statutory to consider granting an easement in gross over Lot 1 Deposited Plan 355061 (recreation reserve) to Aurora Energy Limited had been circulated.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               Stirling-Lindsay

Seconded:          Browne

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Agrees to grant an easement in gross to Aurora Energy Limited for $1 over Lot 1 DP 355061 (recreation reserve), to provide for the undergrounding of a section of their existing network, subject to:

·        All costs associated with preparing and registering the easement being met by Aurora Energy Limited, and;

·        The Minister of Conservation’s consent.

C.      Authorises the Chief Executive to do all that is necessary to give effect to the resolution.

Carried

 

21.1.4         Application for road name approval - North Ridge development, Waikerikeri Valley

A report from the Roading Administration Assistant to consider a request to name one public road in the North Ridge development, Waikerikeri Valley had been circulated.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Garbutt

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Agree that the public road be named Pickett Road.

Carried

 

21.1.5         Application for road name approval - Rolling Ridges development, Waikerikeri Valley

A report from the Roading Administration Assistant to consider a request to name two private right of ways in the Rolling Ridges development, Waikerikeri Valley had been circulated.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               Stirling-Lindsay

Seconded:          Cooney

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Agree that the first private right of way be named Porter Lane.

C.      Agree that the second private right of way be named Patterson Lane.

Carried

 

21.1.6         Local Government New Zealand Community Board Conference 2021

A report from the Governance Support Officer to consider whether the Board would like to send representatives to the Local Government New Zealand Community Board conference in Gore, 22 to 24 April 2021 had been circulated.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               Stirling-Lindsay

Seconded:          Browne

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Approves up to two Vincent Community Board members’ attendance at the Local Government New Zealand Community Board conference in Gore, 22 to 24 April 2021.

C.      Nominate Martin McPherson and Anna Robinson or Ian Cooney to attend.

Carried

 

21.1.7         Grants Programme 2021-22

A report from the Policy Advisor to consider the process for grant applications following the adoption of the 2021-31 Long Term Plan, and to establish a one-off hardship grant had been circulated.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               Browne

Seconded:          Garbutt

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Notes that the Grants Policy 2019 established that grant applications would no longer be accepted as submissions to the long-term plan process.

C.      Notes that transitioning to a fully contestable process may create a one-off funding gap for some groups, potentially causing financial hardship.

D.      Agrees to establish a temporary hardship fund for the first quarter of the 2021-22 financial year, to be funded from the agreed Vincent grant allocation for the 2021-31 Long-term Plan.

Carried

 

21.1.8         Draft 2021/31 Long-term Plan Community Board Budgets

A report from the Executive Manager – Corporate Services to approve the draft budgets for inclusion in Council’s 2021/31 Long-term Plan Consultation Document and supporting documentation had been circulated.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Garbutt

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Adopts the draft 2021/31 Long-term Plan budgets.

C.      Recommends to Council that the draft 2021/31 Long-term Plan budgets be accepted.

Carried

 

 

6                 Reports for Information

 

 

Note: Mr Brian Budd from Central Stories joined the meeting for item 21.1.9.

 

 

21.1.9         Alexandra District Museum Inc Annual Grant Report

A report from the Community Development Officer to provide elected members with a report and presentation on the objectives and actions of Alexandra District Museum Inc. over the past financial year had been circulated.

Mr Budd spoke to the report. He outlined recent exhibitions, book launches and concerts, highlighted recent school visits and discussed joint initiatives with Central Otago REAP and Otago Polytechnic. Mr Budd then responded to questions from the Board.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               Garbutt

Seconded:          Browne

That the report be received.

Carried

 

21.1.10       Governance Report

A report from the Governance Support Officer to provide updates on ongoing projects and legacy status reports had been circulated.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Stirling-Lindsay

A.      That the report be received.

B.      That the changes to the 2021 Meeting Schedule be noted.

Carried

 

7                 Mayor’s Report

21.1.11       Mayor's Report

His Worship the Mayor spoke to his report.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Browne

That the Vincent Community Board receives the report.

Carried

8                 Chair's Report

21.1.12       Chair's Report

Councillor McPherson reported on the following:

·    Had attended a Long-term plan workshop for Council.

·    Attended the Vincent Spatial Plan workshops.

·    Acknowledged staff during recent weather event and acknowledged growers who had lost crops

·    Updated the Board on Plan Change 15 and also the resource consent approval for a new supermarket in Alexandra. 

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Stirling-Lindsay

That the report be received.

Carried

 

9                 Members' Reports

21.1.13       Members' Reports

Mr Garbutt reported on the following:

·    Discussed the Commerce Commission meetings regarding Aurora.

·    Attended the Vincent Spatial Plan workshops.

·    Attended a seminar regarding the potential Lake Onslow project.

·    Discussed the Hospice dinner and noted that it would probably be in March 2022.

Councillor Cooney reported on the following:

·    Attended Long-term Plan workshops for Council

·    Attended the 9 December Council meeting.

·    Attended the Vincent Spatial Plan presentation.

·    Attended the Christmas event in the Omakau Domain.

Ms Sterling-Lindsay reported on the following:

·    Discussed the recent Twilight Market held in Alexandra.

·    Reflected on success of riders from the BMX club at a recent event held in Rangiora.

Dr Browne reported on the following:

·    Attended the Civil Defence workshop.

·    Attended a meeting of the Central Otago District Arts Trust

·    Attended a planning meeting for Alexandra U3A.

·    Attended an Alexandra and Districts Museums Incorporated board meeting.

·    Attended the Alexandra Clyde and Districts Business Group meeting.

·    Attended the opening of the Education Hub at Central Stories.

·    Attended the Vincent Spatial Plan workshop.

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Cooney

That the report be received.

Carried

 

 

10               Date of The Next Meeting

 

The date of the next scheduled meeting is 2 March 2021.

 

 

11               Resolution to Exclude the Public

 

Committee Resolution 

Moved:               McPherson

Seconded:          Stirling-Lindsay

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

Confirmation of Confidential Minutes of Ordinary Board Meeting

The premature disclosure of the financial information would detrimentally affect the Council’s position in the negotiations.

To carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations) (s 7(2)(i)).

21.1.14 - Confidential Governance Report

s7(2)(i) - the withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

 

Carried

 

The public were excluded at 3.36 pm

 

 

The Meeting closed at 3.42 pm.

 

 

...................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


2 March 2021

 

4                 Declaration of Interest

21.2.1         Declarations of Interest Register

Doc ID:      524321

 

1.       Purpose

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

2.       Attachments

 

Appendix 1 - VCB Declarations of Interest   


Vincent Community Board meeting

2 March 2021

 


 


2 March 2021

 

5                 Reports for Decisions

21.2.2         Draft Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan 2021

Doc ID:      521914

 

1.       Purpose of Report

 

To consider submissions to the Draft Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan 2021 and recommend a final plan to Council for adoption.

 

Recommendations

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Resolves that the submissions be received.

C.      Recommends that the suggested amendments and changes be approved by the Board.

D.      Recommends to Council adoption of the Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan 2021.

 

 

2.       Background

 

At its December 2019 meeting the Vincent Community Board (VCB) resolved the following:

 

Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

 

Agree to notify its intention to prepare a Reserve Management Plan for Molyneux Park.

 

The draft plan was prepared during the first half of 2020 and public submissions were sought over a two-month period of October/November 2020. Additionally, all regular users of Molyneux Park were sent documentation to enable them to make a submission. Fifty-six submissions were received and a copy of all submissions along with comments and recommendations are included as Appendices 1 - 3.

 

Six submitters have asked to speak to their submission.

 

A copy of the Draft Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan is attached in Appendix 4.

 

 

3.       Discussion

 

Under Section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act), every recreation reserve must have an operative management plan. The purpose of a management plan is to ensure that the development and implementation of objectives and policies for a reserve enhances the long-term use of the reserve without compromising it’s existing use. A management plan consists of both historical and current information about the reserve, and a list of management statements to guide consistent decision-making regarding the future development and management of the reserve.

 

In addition, the plan must be regularly reviewed as stated under Section 41 (4) of the Act "so that the plan is adapted to changing circumstances or in accordance with increased knowledge; and the Minister may from time to time require the administering body to review its management plan, whether or not the plan requires the approval of the Minister".

 

Molyneux Park comprises 32.4816 hectares and is legally described as Part Section 1 SO 24662, Part Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, Section 13 Block XXVI Town of Alexandra, Lots 1 to 5 DP21404 and Part Lot 6 DP 300663, 3.553 hectares.

 

The Central Otago District Council is the administering body for Molyneux Park in terms of Section 40 of the Reserves Act 1977. The responsibility for administering and managing reserves including Molyneux Park has been delegated to the Vincent Community Board, with Council having the power to adopt the final plan under delegation from the Minister of Conservation.

 

The purpose of the Molyneux Park Management Plan is to provide Central Otago District Council with an effective guide for managing Molyneux Park.

 

The following table summarises Section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 regarding management plans, and the process used to develop this management plan. The current step is highlighted in red.

 

 

Relevant Sections of the Reserves Act

Public Consultation

Description of Activity

Phase

Section 41 (5)

 

 

Section 41 (5)c

 

 

Section 41 (6) a-c

 

 

Section 41 (6) d

 

 

Section 41 (6) d

Optional

 

 

 

 

 

Mandatory

Council notifies the public that it is preparing a management plan and calls for submissions (one month)

                                ò

Public submissions are received and incorporated into a draft management plan

ò

A draft management plan is made available to the public for further comment (two months)

ò

The draft management plan is edited to incorporate input from public submissions

ò

The final document is presented to Council for adoption

 

Management Planning

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41

 

 

Section 41 (4)

 

All policies come into effect and are enforceable by Council

ò

The management plan is continually monitored and reviewed

 

Implementation

 

The main subjects arising from the consultation process were:

·        Request to stop the unformed road within the park
The District Plan identifies this road as “D10-Road to be stopped for recreation purposes”. A formal process would need to be undertaken to stop this road and amalgamate it into the park as a recreation reserve. The road will never foreseeably be formed, and its existence does not create an impediment to activities on the park. Stopping the road however will regularise the situation and allow recreational activities to occur on the land by right.

It is recommended that the unformed road is stopped and amalgamated into the park.

 

·        Future sports fields
The existing Molyneux Park Reserve Management identifies an area for future sports field. This area is also identified in the Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Facility Strategy. As part of the Dunstan Park subdivision the area will be subdivided and designated recreation reserve. The exact size will be determined when the final survey is approved and will comfortably accommodate four rugby fields as and when required. It will also allow netball courts to expand if required.

It is recommended that the area identified is set aside for future sports fields.

 

·        Proposed Hockey Turf
In 2019 the Board –“agreed in principle -  that an area of up to 7,500 m2 is set aside at Molyneux Park for a full sized hockey turf”.

The Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Facility Strategy identified a half turf in Molyneux Park. The Molyneux Turf Group originally proposed an option near the netball courts and feedback received through the consultation process slightly favoured that option. A site closer to the swimming pool would create separation from the land identified for future sports fields by not constraining the area construction of a turf and related ancillary infrastructure.

It is recommended that the proposed hockey turf be located near the swimming pool.

 

·        New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA)
Several submissions were received from the members and the management of NZMCA. While there is some benefit to the local economy, and increased security by having association members staying at the park, it could be argued that camping is not strictly compatible with the sports-based nature of Molyneux Park.

It is recommended that a formal agreement between the parties be developed to give certainty of tenure to NZMCA but acknowledges that if the area is required in the future for sports-based activities the council reserves the right to use it for that. Council would aim to work with NZMCA to locate an alternative site away from Molyneux Park if that reality eventuated.

 

·        Alexandra United Football Club
The Alexandra United Football Club have raised provision of lighting and are seeking permission to place a shipping container at the park for storage. While it is acknowledged that storage is required, shipping containers at various location around the park will detract from the park’s aesthetics and perhaps become a target for graffiti.

It is recommended that containers are not permitted on the park, and clubs store their equipment off site. Alternatively, a purpose built or relocated building could fulfil this function for the football club and other clubs. The plan allows for the erection of sports lights, provided they met required location, mapping and electrical standards.

 

The remainder of submissions that did not focus on the proposed hockey turf or NZMCA sites, generally supported the draft plan’s direction, with the Ministry of Education indicating they support their existing informal agreement with council, which allows the school grounds to be used and vice versa when required by either party for an event. The Ministry would support an ongoing reciprocal use arrangement of open access to the park. This is something that will be worked on between the Ministry and Council.

 

The plan also references the Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Facility Strategy as a guide to any future decision making, particularly regarding facility development at the park.

 

 

4.       Options

 

Option 1 – (Recommended)

 

To consider submissions and make suggested changes to the management plan so that a final version can be recommended to Council for adoption.

 

This will allow the draft management plan to move through the next stage of the process and Staff will finalise the management plan as per the direction of the Board and table the finalised plan for adoption by Council under delegated authority of the Minister of Conservation. 

 

Advantages:

 

·     Meets statutory process as set out in the Reserves Act 1977.

·     Considers the input from community and sports clubs, including corrections and suggestions to the draft plan and the management of the park, provided by way of submission.

·     Provides the Board an opportunity to make changes and amendments to the plan before recommending to Council adoption of the final version.

 

Disadvantages:

·     There are no foreseeable disadvantages.

 

Option 2

 

The Board consider submissions but make no recommended changes to the management

plan.

 

Advantages:

 

·     There are no foreseeable advantages with this option.

 

Disadvantages:

·     If the Board do not consider submissions and feedback, they may jeopardise their relationship with the community.

·     Some robust suggestions on the future management of Molyneux Park have been made by submitters. Failure to incorporate this feedback loses an opportunity to improve the plan.

·     Considerable time and resource have been spent on developing this reserve management plan.

 

 

5.       Compliance

 

Local Government Act 2002 Purpose Provisions

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities. Section 11A of the Local Government Act 2002 states that “In performing its role, a local authority must have particular regard to the contribution [reserves, and other recreational facilities] make to its communities”.

 

In addition, the Reserves Act 1977 states that “the administering body shall…prepare and submit to the Minister for his or her approval a management plan for the reserve under its control, management, or administration.”

 

Financial implications – Is this decision consistent with proposed activities and budgets in long term plan/annual plan?

There are no financial implications in recommending this plan for Council adoption.

 

Decision consistent with other Council plans and policies? Such as the District Plan, Economic Development Strategy etc.

Per the 2018/28 Long Term Plan, the challenge for Parks and Reserves is “to provide recreational facilities that work for the users, whether they are using their spaces for sport or leisure… to work with our community to see what its vision is for our key recreational spaces and reflect this in our reserve management plans and work programmes.” Considering submissions to the draft reserve management plans is essential in understanding the current and future use of the reserve spaces and the community’s expectations.

 

Considerations as to sustainability, the environment and climate change impacts

The plan will have little or no negative environmental impact.

 

 

Risks Analysis

Every recreation reserve must have an operative management plan under section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977. It is also mandatory to make the draft management plan available for public consultation for a minimum two-month period. In addition to the risks of not complying with those stipulations, Council run the risk of jeopardising their relationship with the community if they do not consider the submissions.

 

Significance, Consultation and Engagement (internal and external)

The plan is not significant in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Plan; however the Reserves Act 1977 has its own requirements for consultation which were followed in the preparation of this plan.

 

 

 

6.       Next Steps

 

·        The Board to consider all submissions and make any desired changes to the plan.

·        The final Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan 2021 is presented to Council for adoption.

 

 

7.       Attachments

 

Appendix 1 - Ministry of Education submission Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan

Appendix 2 - Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan submissions and staff comments

Appendix 3 - Alexandra United Football Club Submission

Appendix 4 - Molyneux Park Draft  Reserve Management Plan for consultation

Appendix 5 - Final Draft Molynuex Park Reserve Management Plan 2021  

 

Report author:

Reviewed and authorised by:

 

 

Gordon Bailey

Louise van der Voort

Parks and Recreation Manager

Executive Manager - Planning and Environment

28/01/2021

17/02/2021

 


Vincent Community Board meeting

2 March 2021

 

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Vincent Community Board meeting

2 March 2021

 









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Vincent Community Board meeting

2 March 2021

 



Vincent Community Board meeting

2 March 2021

 

CENTRAL OTAGO DISTRICT COUNCIL

FOR CONSULTATION
MOLYNEUX PARK – DRAFT RESERVE
MANAGEMENT PLAN 2020

Macintosh HD:Users:jaysonkelly:Dropbox:6 Consultancy Projects:Central Otago:CODC Logo.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Prepared by Xyst Limited for Central Otago District Council

 

Client

·      Gordon Bailey, Parks and Recreation Manager, Central Otago District Council

 

xyst_logo_pos

 


 

Contents

 

1.0    Preface to draft reserve management plan                                                                     5

2.0    Introduction                                                                                                                      6

2.1    General                                                                                                                              6

2.2    Purpose of reserve management plan                                                                                6

2.3    How to use this plan                                                                                                           6

3.0    Molyneux Park Description and Use                                                                               7

3.1    Location and Context                                                                                                         7

3.2    Features                                                                                                                             7

3.3    Land Status                                                                                                                        9

3.4    Leases and other occupations                                                                                          10

3.4.1   Leases                                                                                                                           10

3.4.2   Other occupations                                                                                                          10

3.5    Access                                                                                                                             12

3.5.1   Pedestrian and Cycle Access                                                                                         12

3.6    Existing Facilities                                                                                                              13

3.6.1   Alexandra Toy Library                                                                                                    13

3.6.2   Play Area                                                                                                                       13

3.6.3   BMX Track                                                                                                                     13

3.6.4   Bowling Club Complex                                                                                                   13

3.6.5   Central Arena                                                                                                                 13

3.6.6   Fulton Hogan Cycle Park and adjoining skatepark                                                          13

3.6.7   Ice Skating Rink                                                                                                             14

3.6.8   Molyneux Pool                                                                                                                14

3.6.9   Motor Caravan Parking Area                                                                                          14

3.6.10 Netball/Tennis Facility                                                                                                    14

3.6.11 North Eastern Sports Fields (Back Fields)                                                                      14

3.6.12 Scout Hall                                                                                                                       15

3.6.13 Squash Club                                                                                                                   15

3.6.14 Stadium Building                                                                                                            15

3.7    Proposed Facilities                                                                                                           16

3.7.1   Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy 2018  16

3.7.2   The Molyneux Park - Redevelopment Options Study 2008                                             16

3.7.3   Sports Fields                                                                                                                  16

3.7.4   Hockey Field                                                                                                                  17

3.7.5   Other                                                                                                                              18

4.0    Vision and Outcomes                                                                                                     18

4.1    Vision                                                                                                                               18

4.2    Outcomes                                                                                                                        19

5.0    Objectives and Policies                                                                                                 20

5.1    Occupation Agreements                                                                                                   20

5.1.1   General                                                                                                                          20

5.1.2   Leases                                                                                                                           21

5.1.3   Licences                                                                                                                         22

5.1.4   Easements including for underground services                                                               22

5.2    Allocation of the park for sporting use and events                                                            24

5.2.1   Temporary use                                                                                                               24

5.2.1   Sports field bookings                                                                                                      24

5.2.2   Camping                                                                                                                         25

5.2.3   Circuses and side-show operators                                                                                  26

5.2.4   Fireworks displays                                                                                                          26

5.2.5   Alcohol licences                                                                                                             27

5.2.6   Commercial Use                                                                                                             28

5.3    Park Development                                                                                                            29

5.3.1   General                                                                                                                          29

5.3.2   Buildings and structures                                                                                                 30

5.3.3   Car parks                                                                                                                       31

5.3.4   Sports Field Lighting                                                                                                       32

5.3.5   Signs                                                                                                                              33

 

Appendix 1:  Reserve Management Plan process from Reserves Act                                        34

Appendix 2:  Information on Recreation Reserve parcels                                                           35

 


1.0 Preface to draft reserve management plan

 

A reserve management plan provides the community with certainty about the function, future management and development of a reserve.  It is developed by listening to community preferences for the reserve and documenting the best way to provide for them.  A reserve management plan is not a detailed operational plan, instead it provides a framework that guides management decisions.

Local authorities are required to develop reserve management plans for most reserves that are administered under the Reserves Act 1977 and the act sets out a formal public consultation process to engage the community (refer Appendix 1).  Plans must also be reviewed regularly so they remain up to date. 

Most of the land managed as Molyneux Park is subject to the Reserves Act and is classified as ‘recreation reserve’.  The first reserve management plan for Molyneux Park was approved in 2013.  In response to increased recreational use and changes to the surrounding urban land use including additional park area, the Vincent Community Board and the Central Otago District Council, (‘Council’) approved the review of the existing management plan without preliminary consultation in December 2019.

All land parcels that comprise Molyneux Park including those that are not reserves have been incorporated into the management plan to enable a consistent approach to the management of the park.  Land that is currently used principally for recreation purposes is defined as a park and has protection under the Local Government Act 2002. 

Molyneux Park is a significant community resource that provides sports and recreation opportunities for the local and wider community.  The park has undeveloped areas including land which has been recently added to the north of the park.  A proposal to develop a new hockey turf to the west of the netball courts is included in this draft.

This draft is being released for public comment, so the community has the opportunity to provide Council with their feedback on the draft plan.  Council will consider submissions received and prepare a final plan for approval.  When the amended reserve management plan is approved by Council it will replace the 2013 reserve management plan and will guide future management and development of the park.

 

 

Figure 1: Process to revise and update Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan

 


 

2.0 Introduction

2.1      General

Molyneux Park caters for a wide range of recreational needs, with particular emphasis on active sports.  Considerable council and community resources have been applied to the development of the facilities.

Molyneux Park is a local and regional hub for sports and recreation and serves a wide catchment that extends from Roxburgh/Teviot Valley through to the Maniototo.  Molyneux Park also has a regional function for many sports codes particularly cricket. 

 

2.2      Purpose of reserve management plan

According to Section 41(3) of the Reserves Act 1977 a management plan is required to:

“provide for and ensure the use, enjoyment, maintenance, protection and preservation as the case may require and, to the extent that the administering body’s resources permit the development, as appropriate, of the reserve for the purposes of which it is classified.”

The Reserves Act 1977 has further provisions covering activities on reserve land including encroachments, lighting fires, planting trees and damaging turf.

2.3      How to use this plan

This reserve management plan provides the decision-making framework to inform management decisions, including consideration of internal and external requests and proposals for use and development.  The plan sits within a wider framework of legislation, plans and strategies.  To ensure consistent provision of services and to comply with Council policies, many management and operational decisions are determined at a district-wide level. 

Council policies, bylaws and strategies are regularly reviewed, and additional documents may be approved during the time frame of this plan.  Council plans, policies and documents relevant to operational issues on Molyneux Park include the following at the time that this plan is written:

 

District Plan

A District Plan contains guidance and rules about how land, including public land, can be used and developed.  Most of Molyneux Park is designated for ‘recreation purposes’.

10-Year Plan and Annual Plan

The 10-Year Plan, also known as a Long Term Plan, sets the strategic direction and work programme for the 10 years ahead, and the Annual Plan allocates funding for services including asset development

Public Places Bylaw

This bylaw includes provisions around behaviour on public land, including reserves, that puts public safety at risk or causes nuisance, offence, damage or obstruction. It covers controls around trading in public places and temporary closure of reserves.

Smoke Free Policy 2018

Council parks are specified as smoke free areas.

Dog Control Bylaw 2020

Dogs must be kept under continuous control when they are in public places. Dogs are not permitted in prohibited areas including children’s playgrounds and the designated areas of all sports grounds.

Alcohol Restriction in Public Places Bylaw 2019

Establishes ’Alcohol Restriction Zones’ and ‘Temporary Alcohol Restriction Zones’ in public places.

Public Spaces Lighting Policy 2019

Objectives include minimising any adverse impacts associated with unnecessary or inappropriate lighting and protect the region’s dark skies.

Community Leasing and Licensing Policy

Provides a consistent and equitable framework for community leases and licences of council-owned property and facilities to eligible community groups

Tree Policy 2020

Outlines Council’s decision making framework for new tree plantings and tree removals.

 


 

3.0 Molyneux Park Description and Use

3.1      Location and Context

Molyneux Park is located approximately one kilometre north-west of the centre of Alexandra and has frontage to Centennial Avenue (State Highway 8) to the south-west and the Otago Central Rail Trail to the north-west.  The park land is divided by Boundary Road East and includes an unformed section of Russell Road to the north.  Until recently, Molyneux Park was located at the northern edge of the town. 

3.2      Features

Central Alexandra and Molyneux Park are located on a flat river terrace approximately 25-30m above the level of the Clutha/Mata-Au River. 

The park contains areas of sports fields, areas enclosed for sports activities including clubrooms and playing surfaces, a sports stadium, aquatic centre and other facilities including a playground, skate park and bike park, (refer Plan 1 below).  An earth embankment has been established around the main sports ground adjacent to the Molyneux Park stadium building. 

Boundary Road East crosses the park and is formed to the standard of a park driveway rather than a road.  Areas bordering State Highway 8 and the entrances to the park have been planted in ornamental trees and shrubs, and an avenue of trees has been planted at the start of Boundary Road East.

Undeveloped areas in the north of the park are predominantly flat and in rough condition and include sparsely planted pines and rough scrub. 

Soils in the Molyneux Park locality are not ideal for growing trees, and soils may have impeded drainage.  Irrigation has been installed on the playing fields and some passive recreation areas.

A cobbled rock causeway extends from Kinnaird Close, (Lot 42) and under the BMX track (Part Section 1).  The NZAA site record (G42/240) indicates that this was built in the 1870s as part of a road that extended through Alexandra to Waikeri, and it is a protected heritage site.     

 

 

PHOTO – wide view of park or park frontage?


 

 

Plan 1: Molyneux Park features.  Park boundary outlined in yellow.  Numbers refer to leases and other occupations, refer Section 3.4 below.


 

3.3      Land Status

 

Molyneux Park includes land that is subject to the Reserves Act and park land that is not.  The total area of the park is just over 35 hectares excluding road reserve land.

 

Land held under the Reserves Act, (refer Plan 2 below and Appendix 2 for detail):

 

Plan key

Legal description

Land status and classification

CODC Designations, leases, other restrictions

Area (hectares)

A

Part Section 1 SO 24662

(no title)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leases to Toy Library, Scouts, Ice-inline, Includes NZAA site G42/240

10.553

B

Part Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra SO 19448

(CT 536202?)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived. 

D7 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leases to Affinity Funerals, Rugby Club, Shearing Club, Bowling Club

13.966

C

Part Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra (CT 7C/315)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived. 

D7 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leased in entirety to Bowling Club

0.7846

D

Lot 42 DP 501035 (CT 753988)

Historic Reserve

Includes NZAA site G42/240

0.0205

E

Lot 101 DP 353762

Local purpose Reserve

 

0.0217

F

Section 13 Block XXVI Town of Alexandra SO 20155

(CT 9A/168)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived.   

D7 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leased in entirety to Squash Club

0.1452

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total area of reserves (approx.)

 

25.491 hectares

 

Other park land, (refer Plan 2 below):

 

Plan key

Legal description

Land status and classification

CODC Designations, leases, other restrictions

Area (hectares)

G

Lot 1 DP 21404 (CT 13B/229)

Fee simple, Crown endowment for ‘municipal purposes’

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’

0.7231

H

Lot 2 DP 21404

(CT 13B/230)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’, Lease to Netball & Tennis Clubs

0.6759

I

Lot 3 DP 21404

(CT 13B/231)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’, Lease to Netball & Tennis Clubs

0.6745

J

Lot 4 DP 21404

(CT 13B/232)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’

0.8755

K

Lot 4 DP 21404

(CT 13B/232)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’

0.4116

L

Part Lot 6 DP 300663

Awaiting final survey

Lot to be created (RC190481)

6.2024 approx.

R

Road reserves

Road reserve – not legally part of park

In part: D10 ‘Road to be stopped and recreation purposes’

Area not included in total

 

 

Total area

 

9.563 hectares


 

3.4      Leases and other occupations

 

3.4.1  Leases

The following leases are currently in place for Molyneux Park, (refer Plan 1):

 

Plan key

Organisation

Purpose

Details

1

Alexandra Rugby Football Club Inc.

Sports club

Memorandum of Lease over Stadium, (perpetual), established 1988

2

New Zealand Golden Fleece Fine Wool Shearing Society Inc.

Sheep pens

Deed of lease, established 2008

3

‘Custodian’s residence’

Residential

Available for Council staff where they are providing ranger services on park.

4

Affinity Funerals

Carparking for commercial activities

Use of Stadium carpark transferred from Stadium Holdings in 2019.

5

Petanque

Sporting activities

Lease over court areas to south of Bowling Club approved 2020, agreement with Bowling Club for use of club facilities

6

Alexandra Bowling Club

Sports club

Registered lease (perpetual) established 2011

7

Alexandra Squash Rackets Club Inc.

Sports club

Memorandum of lease, established 1982, (perpetual)

8

Iceinline Sports Complex Inc.

Sports club

Memorandum of lease, established 1992

9

Scout Association of NZ (1st Alexandra Scout Group)

Community Group

Deed of lease, established 2003

10

Alexandra Toy Library

Community Group

Deed of lease, established 2005

11

Central Otago Netball Centre

Sports club

Deed of lease established 1990

 

3.4.2  Other occupations

 

Plan key

Organisation

Agreement

Details

12

Alexandra BMX Club

MOU with Council

2017

13

New Zealand Motor Caravan Association

Approval

2007 approval for up to 6 overnight parks and a sign

 

The Spark Telecom facility is located within road reserve (Boundary Road) not Molyneux Park. 

 

 

 

 

Plan 2: Molyneux Park land parcels.  Refer Section 3.3 above.

 

 

 


 

3.5      Access

3.5.1  Vehicular Access

The main entry to Molyneux Park is from the intersection of Boundary Road with State Highway 8 (Centennial Avenue and Clyde-Alexandra Road).  A driveway within the road reserve of Boundary Road East is located centrally within the park and provides access to most activities and car park areas.

To the south of the main entry, a second entry from Centennial Avenue provides access to the stadium and a car park.  A lease over part of this car park was established in 2003 after a notified resource consent process and was reassigned to Affinity Funerals by resource consent in 2018. 

A carpark near the north-eastern corner of the park is accessed from the end of Russell Street and provides predominantly for sports field use.

A designation over the western section of Boundary Road East identifies an intention for this part of the road to be ‘stopped’ and the land used for recreation purposes. It is not proposed vehicle access will be developed through this area.

A designation north of the netball courts over the Otago Central Rail Trail for ‘vehicle access purposes’ is limited to specific access requirements rather than for public vehicle access to park activities, and physical barriers such as bollards will be installed and retained across this boundary to restrict vehicle access.

3.5.1  Pedestrian and Cycle Access

Molyneux Park has very good connectivity with the surrounding street network although a park access from Walker Place is physically blocked by the BMX track. 

The proximity of the Otago Central Rail Trail provides an excellent walking and cycle link to the park that is suitable for family use. 

Pedestrian paths have been developed within the Clyde-Alexandra Road frontage, following part of Boundary Road East, and a path past the playground forms a diagonal connection.

 

PHOTO Related to access


 

3.6      Existing Facilities

Buildings and features located within the park are briefly described below, (refer Plan 1 above for locations).

 

3.6.1  Alexandra Toy Library

The toy library was established on Molyneux Park in 2005.  It is located adjacent to the scout hall.

 

3.6.2  Play Area

A children’s playground with a variety of equipment is located in the south west of the park adjacent to a large sealed car parking area accessed off Centennial Avenue.  Trees around the playground were planted in 2017 as part of the ‘trees for babies’ programme. 

 

PHOTO: Children’s playground and amenity area

 

3.6.3  BMX Track

The Alexandra BMX Club was formed in 2007 and is affiliated with BMX-NZ.  The original track, built by the Dunstan BMX Club, was rebuilt in 2011 by the Alexandra BMX Club to a design capable of hosting New Zealand national and regional competitions. A new start ramp was constructed in 2018 and the facilities are among the best in the South Island.

 

3.6.4  Bowling Club Complex

The Alexandra Bowling Club erected a pavilion in 1982 at Molyneux Park which has since been extended.  The club has two outdoor greens and one indoor rink, an equipment shed, and a parking area.

Petanque

The establishment of a petanque court to the south of the bowling green was approved by Council in 2020.  There is an agreement for petanque players to share use of the Bowling Club pavilion.

 

3.6.5  Central Arena

The Central arena of the Molyneux Park Sports area is fenced and surrounded by an embankment, which provides an excellent viewing area for spectators. The area is used during the winter season as the home ground of the Alexandra Rugby Football Club and is the venue for sub-union rugby matches.  A marked grass athletics track is used during the summer.  The Central Arena also has a first-class cricket wicket that was re-built in 2020.

The Central Arena has been used as a venue for public entertainment, athletics and other sporting events.  Facilities include the stadium building, two toilet blocks, changing rooms suitable for first class cricket, equipment storage shed, score boards and sightscreens for cricket. 

A custodian’s residence within the arena is generally leased on the condition that the resident is required to act as a caretaker and monitor security on the park. 

Sealed parking areas capable of accommodating approximately 160 vehicles are also provided near the arena and stadium building.

The ‘Queenstown Lakes-Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy’ notes that this is a major event facility particularly for cricket as it can host national and international level games.

 

3.6.6  Fulton Hogan Cycle Park and adjoining skatepark

A BMX track and skate park are located in the west of the park.  Fulton Hogan has naming rights over the cycle park as part of a memorandum of understanding. Fulton Hogan provides financial support towards maintenance of this area.

 

PHOTO Bike park? (trees for Babies here as well)

 

3.6.7  Ice Skating Rink

An outdoor Olympic sized (60m x 30m) ice skating rink and club house is sited in the South West corner of the park which is run by Ice Inline. An application to construct two curling rinks to be located to the west of the ice rink was approved by Council in 2020 and funding has been granted by Central Lakes Trust for the construction.

The rink’s refrigeration plant has recently been upgraded as part of an energy-sharing venture with the Molyneux Aquatic Centre which includes a heat transfer agreement. It is proposed that the ice skating facility will be enclosed in the future.

 

PHOTO - Ice skating facility

 

3.6.8  Alexandra Pool

The Alexandra Pool is a council-run facility that was built in 2003 and includes a 25m indoor lap pool, a 13m therapeutic/learners’ pool, spa pool and an outdoor pool. Future extensions during the term of this plan may include a hydro slide and a gymnasium or other associated leisure areas. 

Various programmes are available at the pool, including aquafit, kayak polo, swimming lessons, holiday programmes and pool parties.

 

 

PHOTO Molyneux Aquatic Centre and carpark

 

3.6.9  Motor Caravan Parking Area

Council has approved that 6 car parks are available to members of the NZ Motor Caravan Association to park vehicles for a maximum of 3 nights.  This parking area is in the vicinity of the bike park and aquatic centre.  This was started as a trial in 2007, and reportedly reduces night-time vandalism. 

Additional NZ Motor Caravan Association parking has been added on the unsealed parking area between Boundary Road (East) and the ice-skating rink, and a formal agreement will be established between parties to cover this area.

 

3.6.10 Netball/Tennis Facility

The Central Otago Netball Centre netball courts were established on Molyneux Park in the late 1980s, including nine courts, two of which have lighting.  Four courts have also been marked as tennis courts for dual use.  During the 1990s a two-level pavilion was developed in two stages. The centre is administered by an incorporated society affiliated with Netball Otago.

 

 

PHOTO: Central Otago Netball Centre

 

The courts are currently used mainly for netball related activities particularly during the winter months (April to September), with a regular Saturday competition as well as numerous team practices during the week.  Courts are used for social tennis and tennis coaching and other community activities over the warmer months. The pavilion can be hired out to community groups and businesses as well as being used for social functions.

 

3.6.11 North Eastern Sports Fields (Back Fields)

More than 5 hectares of land to the north of the Central Arena has been developed for multi-purpose sports fields. 

The fields are marked for winter codes including rugby and football.  During summer months this area is marked out with 3 cricket pitches and is also used for softball. 

Athletics have a long jump pit and throwing area (with net) adjacent to the Central Arena embankments.  There are also practice cricket nets located behind the stadium.

Lights have been installed to illuminate a practice sports field in this area.  Additional sportsfield lighting is also contemplated in this plan.

Adjacent grounds at Dunstan High School can be used in association with Molyneux Park when there is high demand such as school age rugby tournaments. 

3.6.12 Scout Hall

 

The Scout Association constructed a scout hall in the area beyond the cycle/skateboard park in 2002.

 

3.6.13 Squash Club

 

The Alexandra Squash Club Inc has established two squash courts and clubrooms within a leased area between the bowling club and the arena. Their leased areas include space for the construction of additional courts in the future. 

 

 

3.6.14 Stadium Building

The stadium was constructed in 1973 and is used by a variety of sports groups. It has been assessed as being earthquake prone and Council is considering redevelopment options.  

The Alexandra Rugby Football clubroom is attached on the arena side of the building and has its own external access. 

The stadium is also used for indoor displays and the Merino Fine Wool Shearing championships; however, the wooden gymnasium floor restricts usage for some events. The stadium kitchen is used by junior rugby on Saturdays during the rugby season.

Alexandra Basketball, the Alexandra Badminton Club and the Alexandra Gymnastics Club use the stadium year-round. 

The stadium includes two squash courts no longer in use since the Alexandra Squash Club relocated to its new facilities. The spaces are now leased to the Alexandra Rugby Club and an indoor rock climbing venture.

 

 

PHOTO of stadium

 

 

 

 

 


 

3.7      Proposed Facilities

3.7.1  Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy 2018

This strategy notes that ‘CODC has a major hub park at Molyneux Park with a large cluster of separate facilities that are not integrated including: Molyneux Stadium (indoor court), Molyneux Oval (cricket), Central Otago Netball Centre (courts and pavilion) plus sports fields and ice rinks and the Aquatic Centre’.

Recommendations in this strategy relevant to development of facilities at Molyneux Park include the following:

·      That Molyneux Park is designated as a ‘major hub park’ for sports activities

·      ‘That opportunities are explored to increase collaboration / partnerships at an operational level between existing community sport hub facilities’ and that a ‘multi-code sport partnership approach’ in all sport hubs to ‘generate economies in scale and aid long-term sustainability’.

·      Any new gym facilities should consider co-location within hubs such as Molyneux Stadium.

·      ‘Develop a new half-field turf area at Molyneux Park in the short to medium term with potential shared use of the Netball Pavilion to provide changing and toilets facilities for hockey users, part-size turf located so that a full-size field can be accommodated in the future’

 

3.7.2  The Molyneux Park - Redevelopment Options Study 2008

This study identified a series of options for enhancing the use of the park through strategic location and relocation of facilities including the following:

 

 

Notes / progress

Renovation of clay cricket wickets

 

Completed

Demolish existing stadium and replace with indoor sports hall beside skate park/sports hub

Options being considered by Council

Relocate croquet to Molyneux Park

Croquet remains at Kenmare Street

Relocate netball/tennis facilities

Netball/tennis have decided not to relocate from their current position

Relocate ice skating rink to be adjacent to the swimming pool

Ice skating rink remains in the current position, however there is an energy sharing agreement between the ice rink and the pool

Create an avenue of trees along Boundary Road East

Trees have been planted along Boundary Road. 

Develop a new playground zone outside the swimming pool entrance

There are no plans to relocate the playground as the current site is considered more suitable.

 

 

3.7.3  Sports Fields

The 2013 Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan includes a proposal to develop further sports fields in area that has recently become part of the park, refer Figure 2 below. 

 

Macintosh HD:Users:jaysonkelly:Desktop:Screen Shot 2013-12-03 at 9.10.15 am.png

Figure 2: 2013 proposal to develop sports fields

 

3.7.4  Hockey Field

In 2019 the Vincent Community Board agreed in principle to set aside an area of up to 7500 square metres in Molyneux Park for a hockey turf. 

The Molyneux Turf Incorporated are advancing the proposal set out in Figure 3 below for a full-sized field, warm up area and additional parking. This is located near the Netball courts to enable possible sharing of pavilion space. This location could compromise the development of future sports field development or expansion of the net ball courts. Figure 3 (a) outlines an alternative location for the turf. This location is closer to the pool and in an area not earmarked for future sports field development. Feedback on both options is being sought through the consultation process of this plan.

Figure 3: Hockey field proposal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3 (a) Hockey field proposal option 2.

 

 

3.7.5  Other

Several clubs may require new or upgraded sports field lights through the term of this plan. Such lights are permitted subject to compliance with other statutory requirements.

Council has a commitment with the Department of Conservation to fence the northern side of the Otago Central Rail Trail from the netball courts to the new subdivision. The purpose of the fence is to prevent vehicle access from Dunstan Road across the Otago Central Rail Trail into Molyneux Park.  The fence is to be installed at the same time as the residential subdivision post and rail fence and will prevent access to what is now an informal access point into the park.

 

4.0 Vision and Outcomes

4.1      Vision

Molyneux Park is managed and developed as the district’s premier sports venue and provides a wide range of sporting and recreation opportunities for the local and wider community.

4.2      Outcomes

1.         Molyneux Park is preserved in perpetuity for the welfare and enjoyment of the general public as well as providing amenity that enhances Alexandra.

 

2.         Development of the park acknowledges its premier sports hub status while also providing for the needs of the local community and having due regard to the public’s right to freedom of entry and access to the park.

 

3.         Recognition that recreational and sporting organisations, through occupation agreements provide a significant role in facilitating recreational and sporting uses of the park.

 

4.         The park's development has regard for the views of the present users as well as consideration of accommodating future trends and emerging activities.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHOTO of central area?

5.0 Objectives and Policies

 

5.1      Occupation Agreements

5.1.1  General

The term occupational agreement refers to any lease, licence, easement (including right-of-way and telecommunication agreement), exchange of letter, or other agreement reached between the Council and a person, organisation, or company that is occupying part of Molyneux Park (including below ground facilities).  Further details of these different agreements and policies follow. 

Council requires that leases are granted, both to satisfy statutory requirements and to clarify the responsibilities of Council and club, including for existing occupations.  Council’s powers to grant leases, licenses and easements over parks varies depending on the status of the park concerned and the rights transferred from the Crown, and any classification under the Reserves Act 1977.  Occupation agreements will be assessed under any current Council policies.

The multiple use of buildings and other facilities by sports and cultural bodies has financial and sustainability benefits. While the sub-letting and shared use of leased facilities to other sports bodies requires the approval of Council, it is generally actively encouraged. If a group seeking a new occupation agreement is able to demonstrate a willingness to share facilities, Council will look more favourably on an application. 

Any structures associated with occupation agreements including signs will require approval from Council as the landowner and may require building consent or other approvals.

This policy is to be read in conjunction with Section 5.3: Park Development.

 

Objectives

 

1.         To confirm the occupation of Molyneux Park for approved uses and facilities by the granting of occupation agreements.

2.         To ensure establishment costs are paid by the agreement holder

3.         To consider the use of Molyneux Park for network utilities only where utilities do not detract from the purposes or amenity of the park and no costs for these utilities are accrued to Council.

4.         To discourage permanent easements and limit timeframes for easements and rights-of-way agreements (e.g. linked to the life of the building or activity).  Applications will be assessed on an individual basis, with an intention that the park values will be reinstated at the completion of the agreement period. No private right-of-way agreements will be permitted.

5.         To ensure the occupation of the ‘custodian’s residence’ meets the requirement of the Reserves Act to have the resident take on a ranger role, which may be voluntary or renumerated.

6..        To encourage the sharing of existing facilities to prevent unnecessary duplication or expansion of facilities.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Applications for leases, licences and other occupations may be allowed on undeveloped areas if there are no adverse effects on park values.

2               Applications for licences will need to be made in writing.

3               All legal costs and agreement costs, as well as the costs of any formation and maintenance to the Council’s satisfaction shall be borne by the grantee.

 

5.1.2  Leases

The management requirements for recreation reserves in the Reserves Act 1977 emphasise the retention of open space and accountability to the public of park management.  On recreation reserves, leases must be drawn up subject to the relevant provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

Requirements differ for land held under other statutes including the Local Government Act.  Council, however, uses the provisions contained in the Reserves Act 1977 as a guide when leasing land not subject to the Reserves Act 1977 to ensure consistency among the various tenancies.  In most cases leases will be subject to Council’s leasing policies and standard lease conditions so that leases are consistent and easier to manage.

The leasing of public land restricts the type of activities that can be undertaken and usually limits use of the land by the general public.  Exclusive use of Molyneux Park has usually involved enclosure to protect the ground surfaces, facilities and equipment required by different groups, and this needs to be balanced against the needs and preferences of the wider community.  The wider effects of a lease on the park and surrounding area should be considered when assessing the suitability of an activity including hours of operation, transport requirements and car parking. 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Long term exclusive use will be subject to a lease if approved, and may be allowed where Council determines that the activity

·      Cannot or should not be located on other land outside the park

·      Provides for shared or multi-use where this is possible. 

·      Is in accordance with the objectives of this management plan and any other relevant Council documents; and

§ Satisfies the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977 or other statutes.

2               New Leases

                 Land may be leased to groups and organisations for the following purposes:

·      The construction of sports facilities and associated buildings at the group’s or organisation’s expense.

·      The construction of buildings and other structures that increase or improve the use of the Molyneux Park for recreation at the group’s or organisation’s expense.

Provided that:

·      There are enough other sportsgrounds, either existing or are about to be created in the locality, to meet the outdoor sporting needs of other groups and the general public.

·      The land is used for recreation or for activities that increase or improve the use of the Molyneux Park for recreation.

·      The proposed activities cannot satisfactorily take place in existing facilities.

3               For existing leases, any opportunities shall be taken to renegotiate existing leases in cases where they do not comply with the policies of this management plan or, in the case of land that is subject to the Reserves Act 1977, with the requirements of the Act.

4               Leases shall incorporate the appropriate provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, except where the Council’s tenure of the land requires otherwise and shall be consistent with this management plan and other Council documents.

5               Any new or renegotiated lease shall include:

·      A clause requiring that there will be no subletting of the leased land or of the building erected thereon without the prior approval of the Council.

·      A clause covering maintenance responsibilities of the lessor and lessee.

6               Hours of operation, ancillary activities, transport and car parking requirements of a potential lessee will be assessed when considering the suitability of a lease. 

7               The notification of proposed leases in this management plan shall serve as public notice for the purposes of the Reserves Act 1977.

8               Leases will be subject to a rental fee, except where Council has resolved that no or reduced rental is required. Rents for approved users (e.g. voluntary recreation facilities, approved community users) will be set at an agreed level.  Rents for commercial use will generally be based on ‘market value’. 

9.              The custodian’s house may be leased to a private individual on the condition that they act as a caretaker by monitoring activity on the park and notifying any security issues to the appropriate Council officer or the police as required.

 

 

5.1.3  Licences

A licence to occupy provides for the non-exclusive right to use a park for a specific purpose.

The Reserves Act 1977 permits the granting of licences including for communication stations.

Licensees may be charged a rental. Council may charge a rental other than a market rental for recreational or management purposes. 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Licences may be granted for communication stations and any works connected with the station, in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 where there are no adverse effects on park values.

 

5.1.4  Easements including for underground services

An easement lawfully grants the rights for one party to use another person’s land for a specified purpose, in this case the use of Molyneux Park for access or utility facilities.

Easements granted will generally have limited timeframes (e.g. linked to the life of the building or an activity) and an annual fee for rental may be required  Conditions regarding reinstatement of the site at the completion of the agreement period should also be included with any permission granted.  By not granting easements in perpetuity, and requiring reinstatement of the site, the values of the park will be re-established.

Easements for private underground or overground facilities can affect future development and will only be considered by Council where no other options are available, and establishment costs and rental may be charged after a market valuation. 

Where easements are approved, easement owners are responsible for maintaining utility facilities (stormwater/wastewater/sewerage/water and gas pipes/electrical/telecommunication cables) connecting between their property and the main network operator’s facilities including reinstatement of park land following work being carried out on facilities.

It is important for Council to know the location and ownership of private utility facilities crossing Molyneux Park so that their location can be taken into consideration when development enhancement or maintenance work is being planned or carried out on the park and for payment to be made for the use of this land.  As-built plans will generally be a requirement of an easement agreement.

 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Applications for pipes, cabling, discharge or drainage rights including applications for Council infrastructure must be made in writing and contain the following information:

·      A statement of alternative pipe location or discharge options and their costs;

·      Discussion on why these alternative options cannot be used;

·      Evidence that the pipes or discharge will not detract from the purpose of the park; and

·      A diagram of the proposed works and a survey.

2               An easement or formal agreement will be required for every pipe, cable, or discharge on Molyneux Park.

3               All legal costs and the costs of formation and maintenance to the Council’s satisfaction shall be borne by the grantee.

4               Payment for the benefit of a pipe, cable or drainage easement shall generally be made at market valuation.

5               Council will require those holding easements for services crossing Molyneux Park to meet the costs of maintaining the pipes or cables.

6               When services and utilities are no longer required, the service / utility owner shall remove them from the site and reinstate the park to Council’s satisfaction.  If this is not completed to Council’s satisfaction, any costs will be recovered from the services/utility owner.

7               No private access easements will be granted across any land covered by this

                 management plan.

 


 

5.2      Allocation of the park for sporting use and events

 

5.2.1  Temporary use

Use of Molyneux Park for an organised event requires prior approval of Council, usually allocated through Council’s park booking system via the Council website.

While events can enhance the public use and enjoyment of Molyneux Park and contribute to the diversity and vibrancy of the community, large numbers of people and activities can adversely affect the park and neighbours.  Council retains full discretion over the number and nature of any organised event on park land or in a Council owned or operated building or facility. 

 

Objectives

 

1          To manage the use of Molyneux Park for events and temporary use so that it is consistent with the values of the park.

 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Events, social activities, functions and exhibitions may be allowed on Molyneux Park, where the adverse effects on other users or lessees, the park and park neighbours of such activities are minimised, and the proposal meets statutory and policy obligations.

2               Applications must be made in writing at least four weeks prior to the event.

3               Where temporary exclusive use is necessary for the holding of an event or activity, part or all of the park will be closed to the public for the duration of that event. 

4               Where part or all of Molyneux Park is to be closed to the public for event use, public notification of this will be made prior to the activity requiring the closure. Where closure is required by a body other than Council, that body will be responsible for meeting the cost of public notification.

5               A charge and / or bond may be levied for all forms of exclusive use.  The bond will be set as per Council’s Fees and Charges Schedule.

                 Bonds may be waived at the discretion of Council.

6               Event organisers are to reinstate the park to the same condition as before the event to the satisfaction of Council. 

 

 

5.2.1  Sports field bookings

Council uses a booking system for the use of the fields, changing rooms and for other park events.  It is expected that this will change to an online booking system during the term of this plan. 

Council’s provision and allocation of sports fields is determined by demand.  It is anticipated that demand will continue to increase over the life of this plan in response to population increase, development of new sports, extended playing seasons, and expectations of higher quality sports surfaces.  These trends will require Council to be increasingly creative in its management and allocation of sports fields. 

During peak use some conflict can occur between codes, and this is likely to increase as use of Molyneux Park increases. 

 

 

 

 

Objectives

 

1          To provide sports fields at Molyneux Park to meet local demand and provide for regional and national sporting events.

2          To balance requests to allocate sports fields bookings to meet demand where this can be achieved.

3          To configure sports fields to best utilise the space available to meet demand for all codes.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Council may invite the heads of the main sporting codes to an annual User Group meeting to discuss their requirements and options to manage these.  

2               Council will generally give priority to sports field bookings from regional or local heads of sports codes, and for in-season rather than out of season bookings.  Programming of other competitions, tournaments, exhibition matches or such like shall be by prior negotiation between the applicant and the Council, and application should be made in writing not less than two weeks prior to the event to allow this to take place.  

3               All bookings for social games shall be made direct to the appropriate sports codes who will levy the social users on a per game basis.  Any other social activities outside the main codes of hockey, football (soccer), rugby, cricket, netball and softball will be booked and charged by Council directly.

4               Council may change the configuration of sports fields to best utilise the space available. 

5               Heads of code shall be responsible for ensuring that all ground furnishings such as goals, goal posts, temporary seating, tents, booths, caravans, temporary fences, corner posts, signs and electrical services comply with all legislation and regulations, including health and safety legislation and the Building Act, and that goal posts are put up no earlier than 2 weeks before the commencement of the season and removed no later than 1 week after the last day of the season unless otherwise approved by Council.

 

 

5.2.2  Camping

The New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA) has an agreement with Council for its members with certified self-contained vehicles to park in the unformed carpark adjacent to the skate park area. 

During the life of this plan this area maybe required for recreational activities or facilities move in keeping with the principles of the Reserves Act. These activities or facilities will take precedent over camping.

Use of the park outside of usual hours can have positive effects including additional surveillance which can reduce vandalism.  Negative effects of camping can include damage to the park and facilities and public health concerns. 

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow camping to take place at Molyneux Park where this is associated with events and this is compatible with other park activities.

 

2          To allow members of the NZMCA to camp in specific areas in accordance with any agreements between the NZMCA and Council where this is compatible with other park activities.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council may approve camping associated with sporting and community events where there is evidence that the effects of camping will be adequately managed.  All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least four weeks before the event.  Applications will be considered on a case by case basis, and a bond will be required. The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions.

 

 

2               Members of the NZMCA may camp in designated areas of the park, subject to any formal agreement between the NZMCA and Council and the conditions contained therein.

 

 

 

5.2.3  Circuses and side-show operators

The Central Otago District Council occasionally receives requests from circuses, side-shows, gypsy fairs and similar operators for use of Molyneux Park. 

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow occasional use of Molyneux Park for circuses, side-shows and similar uses provided that this is compatible with other park activities.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council may approve circuses, side shows, gypsy fairs and like operations where there is evidence that the adverse effects can be minimised.  All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least four weeks before the event.  Applications will be considered on a case by case basis, and a bond will be required. The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions.

 

 

5.2.4  Fireworks displays

Groups occasionally wish to use Molyneux Park for fireworks displays.  These displays require the permission of Fire and Emergency NZ before proceeding, and adverse effects of fireworks displays on park values need to be minimised.

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow fireworks displays on Molyneux Park subject to all adverse effects on park values can be minimised.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Council may approve fireworks displays where there is evidence that the adverse effects of this use can be minimised.  All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least 10 working days before the event and Applications will be considered on a case by case basis, and a bond will be required.  Final approval will not be given by Council until required external permissions have been obtained including a FENZ permit. 

The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions

·      Public liability insurance.

 

 

2               Fireworks displays are only permitted within the Central Arena, and only if damage to the central cricket wicket can be avoided.

 

 

5.2.5  Alcohol licences

The selling of alcohol is often viewed by sports clubs as a means of raising funds for club activities however is only indirectly linked to the use of the park for sporting or recreational purposes. 

The consumption of alcohol on the park can have adverse effects on people using the park and park neighbours including noise and damage that may reduce the amenity of the park.

Approval is needed from Council as landowner of the park, and separately from Council for an alcohol licence.  Other approvals, including resource consent, may also be required.

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow the granting of alcohol licences over premises on Molyneux Park where the values of the park are not diminished and where the effects on other park users and park neighbours can be minimised.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council as landowner may support the granting of alcohol licences for premises located on Molyneux Park where the adverse effects of this use can be minimised.

All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least four weeks before the event.

 

The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Whether the activity is consistent with the purposes of the park, i.e. whether it is ancillary to the principal sport and recreation purpose of the park.

·      Traffic and parking demand

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions including host responsibility provisions.

 

 

 

 

5.2.6  Commercial Use

 

Council may, from time to time, receive applications for the use of Molyneux Park for temporary or permanent commercial activities. These activities include filming, markets, coffee carts and commercial recreation ventures, amongst other commercial activities.

 

Commercial activities may be a legitimate part of the range of activities within parks where they relate to the purposes of the park.  Some commercial activities such as filming regional or national sporting events may be assessed as appropriate while not contributing to the public’s enjoyment of the park.  Such activities can promote Alexandra and educate people about the value of natural resources.

 

While commercial activities can be appropriate, they must not be allowed to detract from the primary purposes of the park.  Also, the activities should not adversely impact on the park, its use or users and park neighbours.  Controls on activities should ensure that the effects of activities are minimised.  All commercial activity is required to comply with Council bylaws and other relevant legislation.

 

Objectives

 

1          To ensure any permanent or temporary commercial use of Molyneux Park does not compromise the park’s values, adds to the public enjoyment of the park and is in accordance with the Reserves Act and relevant bylaw.

 

 

POLICIES

 

2               All applications to operate commercial activities on Molyneux Park shall be made to Council in writing.  Applications should include:

2.1     A description of the proposed activity;

2.2     A description identifying the places where the proposed activity will be carried out;

2.3     A description of the potential effects of the proposed activity, and any actions which the applicant proposes to minimise any adverse effects;

2.4     A statement of the proposed duration of the activity and the reasons for the proposed duration;

2.5     Relevant information relating to the applicant, including any information relevant to the applicant’s ability to carry out the proposed activity.

3               Temporary commercial activity applications need to be made at least ten working days       prior to the event.

4               Conditions necessary for the protection of values will be imposed on any permission for the commercial use of Molyneux Park.  Such conditions will also be sought on any resource consent application for the same activity.

5               A charge may be levied for the commercial use of Molyneux Park.

6               A bond maybe required for permanent and temporary commercial activities.

7               Compliance with the relevant conditions of the Resource Management, Building, Health and Safety in Employment Acts and other relevant Acts including the District Plan is the responsibility of the applicant.

 


 

5.3      Park Development

5.3.1  General

 

In addition to providing space for sport and recreation activities, parks provide wider benefits including amenity to the surrounding area and pedestrian connectivity.  Parks can provide important open space areas for all ages to play, whether that is through using natural features, or through the provision of formal playgrounds, skate parks or bike parks.  Park values may be reduced where buildings and other enclosed structures including fences prevent access and dominate the park. 

Community needs change, and sport and active recreation facilities need to be adaptable and flexible to meet the needs of a wider range of activities and users into the future.  The ‘Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy’ supports a multi-code sport partnership approach to facility provision for economic and adaptive reasons, and for codes to co-locate when existing facilities need renewal. 

In a Sport New Zealand survey published in 2015, walking was the most popular sport and recreation activity, with 60% of adults participating over the past 12 months[1].  Walking activities, including dog walking, bring activity to parks outside of times where organised sport takes place which can improve surveillance and reduce vandalism.  Recreational walking can be encouraged by the construction of paths through the site and amenity improvements including tree planting.  Well-located paths will also support active transport to events or commuting options.

Recreation facilities such as the existing bike hub, skate park and playground also support greater use of the park throughout the week and are convenient for families attending sport events.

A significant number of both overhead and underground services are located on Molyneux Park and Boundary Road East, including water, irrigation, drainage, wastewater, power and tele-communications services.  The exact location of services needs to be determined prior to planning and building structures, and enquiries should be made to the service owner and Council.  The park includes protected heritage sites which may need to be located.

Most of the area of Molyneux Park is designated in the District Plan ‘for recreation purposes’ which reduces Resource Management Act approval requirements for recreation activities.

 

Plan 3: Proposed park development.

 

5.3.2  Buildings and structures

All buildings and structures including signs, temporary structures, lighting, fences and art will require approval from Council as the landowner and may require amendments to the lease including the clarification of maintenance.  They may also require building consent and other approvals. 

Any structures should be located where they allow for access within and through the park and should be designed to be compatible with the amenity of the park. 

Council will only provide amenity lighting for carparks and paths where there is a clear public benefit.  This will be limited to Council-owned facilities. and in accordance with Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CEPTD) principles.

Public art is one of the more visible and accessible forms of art, and if placed within a park is often complimentary to both the installation and the location. However public art can be controversial, and if located in the wrong place, may not support the primary purpose of the park. The location of any public art installation must be in keeping with the scale and values of the park, and it must not unduly impact on the cost or operation of recreation or maintenance activities

 

Objectives

 

1          To ensure that buildings and other structures do not dominate Molyneux Park and are located, designed and maintained so that they do not detract from the amenity of the park and facilitate public recreational use and enjoyment.

2          To support the development or redevelopment of buildings and structures on the park where the need for these has been fully assessed and it is demonstrated that recreation and community outcomes are better enabled.

3          To encourage sharing of existing facilities to prevent unnecessary duplication or expansion of facilities.

4          To ensure that buildings and structures have necessary approvals.

5          To encourage and allow for networks of paths for pedestrians and/or cyclists

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               The multiple use of buildings and other facilities by sports and recreation clubs shall be actively encouraged including subletting.  A new building will only be erected where it is not suitable to use a modified existing building, or possible to share facilities with other users.  Buildings shall be designed or modified for multi-purpose use where practicable.

2               New buildings on the park shall only be considered where:

·   they meet a specific proven need

·   Neither the location of the building, nor associated car-parking, unduly restrict the area useable for outdoor recreation or utilisation of the park.

·   They do not obstruct the entrances to the park, either physically or visually, including access for emergency vehicles.

·   They do not detract from the appearance or open nature of the park, especially as seen from surrounding roads.

3               All new buildings and structures shall be of a size and design that:

·   Is such that they provide no more than a service ancillary to the use of the area for sport.

·   Is to acceptable architectural standards.

·   Is in scale with, and suited to, the character of the park.

·   If possible, they shall be sited so that they can be extended to provide such further facilities as may be required later.

4               When assessing proposals for buildings and structures, Council’s assessment and discretion will include the following:

·       Location and size of building or structure

·       Proposed lighting

·       Materials and finishes

·       Servicing requirements

·       Associated provision for transport including carparking

·       Proposed signs including inward facing signs on fences

·       Proposed landscaping

·       Access and carparking.

 

 

5.3.3  Car parks

Car parks support recreational use by people who need to drive to the park including those travelling longer distances however, over-supply will encourage car use by those that have other options. 

Car parking areas reduce park land available for recreation and encourage access by vehicles.  The ‘Sport & Recreation Facility Development Guide’ published by Sport New Zealand in 2019 recommends that sustainable transport options are promoted for parks, and that cycleways and walkways are designed as part of the site plan to improve transport options.  Large areas of Alexandra are within a ten-minute walk from the park, and the Otago Central Rail Trail provides a readily accessible cycle link connecting Molyneux Park to central Alexandra.  Parking in the park and surrounding areas is needed for those who do not have other options including visitors for district wide sports events.

The location and design of parking areas should not be at the expense of areas useable for outdoor sports, although parking areas may also be useful for other activities. Parking should not be designed to meet peak parking times. 

 

 

Objective

 

1          To provide carparking to at a level to meet but not exceed necessary parking demand.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Permanent car parking areas will not exceed 10% of the total developed area of the park. 

 

 

5.3.4 Sports Field Lighting

 

Lighting enables use of sports fields over longer periods of time, thus spreading the wear and increasing the capacity of each lit sports field area.  Lighting of sports fields also enables increased recreation opportunity through allowing participation after hours during the working week. 

However, there may be negative impacts associated with sports lighting and the capital cost of installing lighting is significant.  All lighting installations must obtain all required consents.

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow lighting of sports fields provided that the adverse effects of lighting can be minimised.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council may approve clubs installing sports lighting where there is evidence that the adverse effects of lighting can be minimised, subject to necessary consents being granted.

 

 

2               A condition of approval includes an agreement that Council may require the light owner to undertake regular safety audits of lighting structures, and that any defective items identified will be remedied to Council’s satisfaction by the light owner within three months of notification of the defect.

 

 

3               Council has the right to determine when lighting can and cannot be used in the best interests of protecting the playing surface.

 

 

4               Costs incurred for the operation of sports field lighting will be the responsibility of the owner of the lights.

 


 

5.3.5 Signs

Signs can play an important role in wayfinding and reinforcing a park’s identity and status.  Signs are also essential in aiding identification of hazards that visitors might be exposed to.  Some areas have important or special stories to tell and can be enhanced by the use of interpretive signage. 

The use of promotional or advertising signage is one way that organisations are able to raise income over and above levying their membership, however signs other than those inside club buildings that are not visible from public places are generally not appropriate. 

Inward facing signs on fences may be visible from the surrounding park area and will increase the fence being a visual barrier.  Signs must comply with any district plan requirements.

Section 5.3.2: Buildings and structures will also apply to the location of free-standing signs.

 

Objectives

 

1          To provide sufficient signs of a design appropriate to the park to facilitate public use and enjoyment of the outdoor recreational environment.

 

2        To control the display of club and sponsorship signs on Molyneux Park.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Signs shall be provided to give clear and positive guidance to assist public enjoyment of the park.

2               Generally, all signs and symbols on the park shall be of standard design and appropriately placed in their surroundings.

3               The number and size of signs in the park shall be kept to a minimum to avoid visual detraction from the amenity of the park.

4               The Council may provide interpretive information for areas of interest at Molyneux Park.

5               Where possible signs will be located on existing buildings and structures.

6               Clubroom signs are permitted not more than a total of three-square metres relating to the use of the site (i.e. not advertising signs).

8               Unless specifically approved by Council, advertising signage will not be allowed at Molyneux Park.

9               Where advertising signage is approved by Council, it will still be subject to obtaining a resource consent or sited where resource consent is not required. 

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix 1:  Reserve Management Plan process from Reserves Act

 

The following table summarises section 41 of the Reserves Act (1977) – Management Plans, and the process used to develop and revise a management plan.  When a plan is being revised the first 2 steps may not be repeated.

 

 

Relevant Sections of the Reserves Act

 

Public Consultation

 

Description of Activity

 

Phase

 

Section 41 (5)

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (5)c

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) a-c

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) d

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) d

 

Optional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mandatory

 

Council notifies the public that it is preparing a management plan and calls for submissions

(1 month)

ò

Public submissions are received and incorporated into a draft management plan

ò

A draft management plan is made available to the public for further comment (2 months)

ò

The draft management plan is edited to incorporate input from public submissions

ò

The final document is presented to Council for adoption

 

Not undertaken for this review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Planning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) e

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (4)

 

 

Council adopts management plan

ò

All policies come into effect and are enforceable by Council

ò

The management plan is continually monitored and reviewed

 

Implementation

 

 


 

Appendix 2:  Information on Recreation Reserve parcels

Documents the land is held in:

 

·     GN 1904/2703 and 1958/711. Part Section 1 SO 24662- reserve, classified and vested in Council by NZ GN 1999/4370

·     CT9A/168-Section 13 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 1450m².

·     CT7C/315-Part Section 12 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 8000m².

·     GN1958 page 721-Part Section 12 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 4775m² (area derived from prior appellation being Sec 10, 4775m² as set out in this GN prior to reappellation of this section with other land to Section12.

·     GN1904 page 2704-Part Section 12 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 13.4375ha. (Area by deduction of the above areas from the original area of Section 12)

 

Chronological Order of Status Actions

 

·      SO 14033 Town map of Alexandra – Defined Town Belt, Town of Alexandra.

·      GN 1904 page 2703 permanently reserved Town Belt for a Public park. (Registered as 5000607/1)

·      GN 1958 page 721 Section 10 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, added to the Alexandra Domain.

·      Reappellation Section 10 Block XXXVII and part Town Belt re-appellated to Section 12 Block XXXVII town of Alexandra, 14.860ha. Copy of re-appellation document not obtained but re-appellation is evidenced by the description in GN 1980-page 1497 below as “Section 12 Block XXVII Town of Alexandra (previously section 10 Block XXVII and part Town Belt).

·      CT7C/315 Issued for Part Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, 8000m². Note the balance of Section 12 is held in GN 1904 page 2704and GN 1958 page 721 (previously the part of Sec 12 in this GN being Sec 10).

·      GN 1980-page 1497 Classified Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, (Registered as 536202) for recreation purposes.

·      574823/1 re-appellated Part of Section 12 as section 13 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, 1450m².

·      CT9A/168 Issued for Section 13 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra

·      GN 1999-page 4370 Section 1 SO 24662 reserved, classified and vested in (Registered as 982000) Council as a recreation reserve.

·      Gazette 2004-page 1371/2. Vested Pt Sec 12 (that part in CT73/315) & Sec 13 in Council in trust for recreation purposes. DOC’s historical files suggested the land was vested in Council by Section 26A Reserves Act 1977 [on the 1980 classification of Sec 12 for recreation].

 


Vincent Community Board meeting

2 March 2021

 

CENTRAL OTAGO DISTRICT COUNCIL

FINAL DRAFT
MOLYNEUX PARK – DRAFT RESERVE
MANAGEMENT PLAN 2021

Macintosh HD:Users:jaysonkelly:Dropbox:6 Consultancy Projects:Central Otago:CODC Logo.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Prepared by Xyst Limited for Central Otago District Council

 

Client

·      Gordon Bailey, Parks and Recreation Manager, Central Otago District Council

 

xyst_logo_pos

 


 

Contents

 

1.0    Preface to draft reserve management plan                                                                     5

2.0    Introduction                                                                                                                      6

2.1    General                                                                                                                              6

2.2    Purpose of reserve management plan                                                                                6

2.3    How to use this plan                                                                                                           6

3.0    Molyneux Park Description and Use                                                                               7

3.1    Location and Context                                                                                                         7

3.2    Features                                                                                                                             7

3.3    Land Status                                                                                                                        9

3.4    Leases and other occupations                                                                                          10

3.4.1   Leases                                                                                                                           10

3.4.2   Other occupations                                                                                                          10

3.5    Access                                                                                                                             12

3.5.1   Pedestrian and Cycle Access                                                                                         12

3.6    Existing Facilities                                                                                                              13

3.6.1   Alexandra Toy Library                                                                                                    13

3.6.2   Play Area                                                                                                                       13

3.6.3   BMX Track                                                                                                                     13

3.6.4   Bowling Club Complex                                                                                                   13

3.6.5   Central Arena                                                                                                                 13

3.6.6   Fulton Hogan Cycle Park and adjoining skatepark                                                          13

3.6.7   Ice Skating Rink                                                                                                             14

3.6.8   Molyneux Pool                                                                                                                14

3.6.9   Motor Caravan Parking Area                                                                                          14

3.6.10 Netball/Tennis Facility                                                                                                    14

3.6.11 North Eastern Sports Fields (Back Fields)                                                                      14

3.6.12 Scout Hall                                                                                                                       15

3.6.13 Squash Club                                                                                                                   15

3.6.14 Stadium Building                                                                                                            15

3.7    Proposed Facilities                                                                                                           16

3.7.1   Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy 2018  16

3.7.2   The Molyneux Park - Redevelopment Options Study 2008                                             16

3.7.3   Sports Fields                                                                                                                  16

3.7.4   Hockey Field                                                                                                                  17

3.7.5   Other                                                                                                                              18

4.0    Vision and Outcomes                                                                                                     18

4.1    Vision                                                                                                                               18

4.2    Outcomes                                                                                                                        19

5.0    Objectives and Policies                                                                                                 20

5.1    Occupation Agreements                                                                                                   20

5.1.1   General                                                                                                                          20

5.1.2   Leases                                                                                                                           21

5.1.3   Licences                                                                                                                         22

5.1.4   Easements including for underground services                                                               22

5.2    Allocation of the park for sporting use and events                                                            24

5.2.1   Temporary use                                                                                                               24

5.2.1   Sports field bookings                                                                                                      24

5.2.2   Camping                                                                                                                         25

5.2.3   Circuses and side-show operators                                                                                  26

5.2.4   Fireworks displays                                                                                                          26

5.2.5   Alcohol licences                                                                                                             27

5.2.6   Commercial Use                                                                                                             28

5.3    Park Development                                                                                                            29

5.3.1   General                                                                                                                          29

5.3.2   Buildings and structures                                                                                                 30

5.3.3   Car parks                                                                                                                       31

5.3.4   Sports Field Lighting                                                                                                       32

5.3.5   Signs                                                                                                                              33

 

Appendix 1:  Reserve Management Plan process from Reserves Act                                        34

Appendix 2:  Information on Recreation Reserve parcels                                                           35

 


1.0 Preface to draft reserve management plan

 

A reserve management plan provides the community with certainty about the function, future management and development of a reserve.  It is developed by listening to community preferences for the reserve and documenting the best way to provide for them.  A reserve management plan is not a detailed operational plan, instead it provides a framework that guides management decisions.

Local authorities are required to develop reserve management plans for most reserves that are administered under the Reserves Act 1977 and the act sets out a formal public consultation process to engage the community (refer Appendix 1).  Plans must also be reviewed regularly so they remain up to date. 

Most of the land managed as Molyneux Park is subject to the Reserves Act and is classified as ‘recreation reserve’.  The first reserve management plan for Molyneux Park was approved in 2013.  In response to increased recreational use and changes to the surrounding urban land use including additional park area, the Vincent Community Board and the Central Otago District Council, (‘Council’) approved the review of the existing management plan without preliminary consultation in December 2019.

All land parcels that comprise Molyneux Park including those that are not reserves have been incorporated into the management plan to enable a consistent approach to the management of the park.  Land that is currently used principally for recreation purposes is defined as a park and has protection under the Local Government Act 2002. 

Molyneux Park is a significant community resource that provides sports and recreation opportunities for the local and wider community.  The park has undeveloped areas including land which has been recently added to the north of the park.  A proposal to develop a new hockey turf to the west of the netball courts is included in this draft.

This draft is being released for public comment, so the community has the opportunity to provide Council with their feedback on the draft plan.  Council will consider submissions received and prepare a final plan for approval.  When the amended reserve management plan is approved by Council it will replace the 2013 reserve management plan and will guide future management and development of the park.

 

 

Figure 1: Process to revise and update Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan

 


 

2.0 Introduction

2.1      General

Molyneux Park caters for a wide range of recreational needs, with particular emphasis on active sports.  Considerable council and community resources have been applied to the development of the facilities.

Molyneux Park is a local and regional hub for sports and recreation and serves a wide catchment that extends from Roxburgh/Teviot Valley through to the Maniototo.  Molyneux Park also has a regional function for many sports codes particularly cricket. 

 

2.2      Purpose of reserve management plan

According to Section 41(3) of the Reserves Act 1977 a management plan is required to:

“provide for and ensure the use, enjoyment, maintenance, protection and preservation as the case may require and, to the extent that the administering body’s resources permit the development, as appropriate, of the reserve for the purposes of which it is classified.”

The Reserves Act 1977 has further provisions covering activities on reserve land including encroachments, lighting fires, planting trees and damaging turf.

2.3      How to use this plan

This reserve management plan provides the decision-making framework to inform management decisions, including consideration of internal and external requests and proposals for use and development.  The plan sits within a wider framework of legislation, plans and strategies.  To ensure consistent provision of services and to comply with Council policies, many management and operational decisions are determined at a district-wide level. 

Council policies, bylaws and strategies are regularly reviewed, and additional documents may be approved during the time frame of this plan.  Council plans, policies and documents relevant to operational issues on Molyneux Park include the following at the time that this plan is written:

 

District Plan

A District Plan contains guidance and rules about how land, including public land, can be used and developed.  Most of Molyneux Park is designated for ‘recreation purposes’.

10-Year Plan and Annual Plan

The 10-Year Plan, also known as a Long Term Plan, sets the strategic direction and work programme for the 10 years ahead, and the Annual Plan allocates funding for services including asset development

Public Places Bylaw

This bylaw includes provisions around behaviour on public land, including reserves, that puts public safety at risk or causes nuisance, offence, damage or obstruction. It covers controls around trading in public places and temporary closure of reserves.

Smoke Free Policy 2018

Council parks are specified as smoke free areas.

Dog Control Bylaw 2020

Dogs must be kept under continuous control when they are in public places. Dogs are not permitted in prohibited areas including children’s playgrounds and the designated areas of all sports grounds.

Alcohol Restriction in Public Places Bylaw 2019

Establishes ’Alcohol Restriction Zones’ and ‘Temporary Alcohol Restriction Zones’ in public places.

Public Spaces Lighting Policy 2019

Objectives include minimising any adverse impacts associated with unnecessary or inappropriate lighting and protect the region’s dark skies.

Community Leasing and Licensing Policy

Provides a consistent and equitable framework for community leases and licences of council-owned property and facilities to eligible community groups

Tree Policy 2020

Outlines Council’s decision making framework for new tree plantings and tree removals.

 


 

3.0 Molyneux Park Description and Use

3.1      Location and Context

Molyneux Park is located approximately one kilometre north-west of the centre of Alexandra and has frontage to Centennial Avenue (State Highway 8) to the south-west and the Otago Central Rail Trail to the north-west.  The park land is divided by Boundary Road East and includes an unformed section of Russell Road to the north. Molyneux Park is located at the northern edge of the town. 

3.2      Features

Central Alexandra and Molyneux Park are located on a flat river terrace approximately 25-30m above the level of the Clutha/Mata-Au River. 

The park contains areas of sports fields, areas enclosed for sports activities including clubrooms and playing surfaces, a sports stadium, aquatic centre and other facilities including a playground, skate park and bike park, (refer Plan 1 below).  An earth embankment has been established around the main sports ground adjacent to the Molyneux Park stadium building. 

Boundary Road East crosses the park and is formed to the standard of a park driveway rather than a road.  Areas bordering State Highway 8 and the entrances to the park have been planted in ornamental trees and shrubs, and an avenue of trees has been planted at the start of Boundary Road East.

Undeveloped areas in the north of the park are predominantly flat and in rough condition and include sparsely planted pines and rough scrub. 

Soils in the Molyneux Park locality are not ideal for growing trees, and soils may have impeded drainage.  Irrigation has been installed on the playing fields and some passive recreation areas.

A cobbled rock causeway extends from Kinnaird Close, (Lot 42) and under the BMX track (Part Section 1).  The NZAA site record (G42/240) indicates that this was built in the 1870s as part of a road that extended through Alexandra to Waikeri, and it is a protected heritage site.     

 

 

PHOTO – wide view of park or park frontage?


 

 

 

 

 

Plan 1: Molyneux Park features.  Park boundary outlined in yellow.  Numbers refer to leases and other occupations, refer Section 3.4 below.


 

3.3      Land Status

 

Molyneux Park includes land that is subject to the Reserves Act and park land that is not.  The total area of the park is just over 35 hectares excluding road reserve land.

 

Land held under the Reserves Act, (refer Plan 2 below and Appendix 2 for detail):

 

Plan key

Legal description

Land status and classification

CODC Designations, leases, other restrictions

Area (hectares)

A

Part Section 1 SO 24662

(no title)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leases to Toy Library, Scouts, Ice-inline, Includes NZAA site G42/240

10.553

B

Part Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra SO 19448

(CT 536202?)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived. 

D7 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leases to Affinity Funerals, Rugby Club, Shearing Club, Bowling Club

13.966

C

Part Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra (CT 7C/315)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived. 

D7 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leased in entirety to Bowling Club

0.7846

D

Lot 42 DP 501035 (CT 753988)

Historic Reserve

Includes NZAA site G42/240

0.0205

E

Lot 101 DP 353762

Local purpose Reserve

 

0.0217

F

Section 13 Block XXVI Town of Alexandra SO 20155

(CT 9A/168)

Recreation Reserve, Crown derived.   

D7 ‘Recreation Purposes’, leased in entirety to Squash Club

0.1452

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total area of reserves (approx.)

 

25.491 hectares

 

Other park land, (refer Plan 2 below):

 

Plan key

Legal description

Land status and classification

CODC Designations, leases, other restrictions

Area (hectares)

G

Lot 1 DP 21404 (CT 13B/229)

Fee simple, Crown endowment for ‘municipal purposes’

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’

0.7231

H

Lot 2 DP 21404

(CT 13B/230)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’, Lease to Netball & Tennis Clubs

0.6759

I

Lot 3 DP 21404

(CT 13B/231)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’, Lease to Netball & Tennis Clubs

0.6745

J

Lot 4 DP 21404

(CT 13B/232)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’

0.8755

K

Lot 4 DP 21404

(CT 13B/232)

As above

D8 ‘Recreation Purposes’

0.4116

L

Part Lot 6 DP 300663

Awaiting final survey

Lot to be created (RC190481)

6.2024 approx.

R

Road reserves

Road reserve – not legally part of park

In part: D10 ‘Road to be stopped and recreation purposes’

Area not included in total

 

 

Total area

 

9.563 hectares


 

3.4      Leases and other occupations

 

3.4.1  Leases

The following leases are currently in place for Molyneux Park, (refer Plan 1):

 

Plan key

Organisation

Purpose

Details

1

Alexandra Rugby Football Club Inc.

Sports club

Memorandum of Lease over Stadium, (perpetual), established 1988

2

New Zealand Golden Fleece Fine Wool Shearing Society Inc.

Sheep pens

Deed of lease, established 2008

3

‘Custodian’s residence’

Residential

Available for Council staff where they are providing ranger services on park.

4

Affinity Funerals

Carparking for commercial activities

Use of Stadium carpark transferred from Stadium Holdings in 2019.

5

Petanque

Sporting activities

Lease over court areas to south of Bowling Club approved 2020, agreement with Bowling Club for use of club facilities

6

Alexandra Bowling Club

Sports club

Registered lease (perpetual) established 2011

7

Alexandra Squash Rackets Club Inc.

Sports club

Memorandum of lease, established 1982, (perpetual)

8

Iceinline Sports Complex Inc.

Sports club

Memorandum of lease, established 1992

9

Scout Association of NZ (1st Alexandra Scout Group)

Community Group

Deed of lease, established 2003

10

Alexandra Toy Library

Community Group

Deed of lease, established 2005

11

Central Otago Netball Centre

Sports club

Deed of lease established 1990

 

3.4.2  Other occupations

 

Plan key

Organisation

Agreement

Details

12

Alexandra BMX Club

MOU with Council

2017

13

New Zealand Motor Caravan Association

Approval

2007 approval for up to 6 overnight parks and a sign

 

The Spark Telecom facility is located within road reserve (Boundary Road) not Molyneux Park. 

 

 

 

 

Plan 2: Molyneux Park land parcels.  Refer Section 3.3 above.

 

 

 


 

3.5      Access

3.5.1  Vehicular Access

The main entry to Molyneux Park is from the intersection of Boundary Road with State Highway 8 (Centennial Avenue and Clyde-Alexandra Road).  A driveway within the road reserve of Boundary Road East is located centrally within the park and provides access to most activities and car park areas.

To the south of the main entry, a second entry from Centennial Avenue provides access to the stadium and a car park.  A lease over part of this car park was established in 2003 after a notified resource consent process and was reassigned to Affinity Funerals by resource consent in 2018. 

A carpark near the north-eastern corner of the park is accessed from the end of Russell Street and provides predominantly for sports field use.

A designation over the western section of Boundary Road East identifies an intention for this part of the road to be ‘stopped’ and the land used for recreation purposes. It is not proposed vehicle access will be developed through this area.

A designation north of the netball courts over the Otago Central Rail Trail for ‘vehicle access purposes’ is limited to specific access requirements rather than for public vehicle access to park activities, and physical barriers such as bollards will be installed and retained across this boundary to restrict vehicle access.

3.5.1  Pedestrian and Cycle Access

Molyneux Park has very good connectivity with the surrounding street network although a park access from Walker Place is physically blocked by the BMX track. 

The proximity of the Otago Central Rail Trail provides an excellent walking and cycle link to the park that is suitable for family use. 

Pedestrian paths have been developed within the Clyde-Alexandra Road frontage, following part of Boundary Road East, and a path past the playground forms a diagonal connection.

 

PHOTO Related to access


 

3.6      Existing Facilities

Buildings and features located within the park are briefly described below, (refer Plan 1 above for locations).

 

3.6.1  Alexandra Toy Library

The toy library was established on Molyneux Park in 2005.  It is located adjacent to the scout hall.

 

3.6.2  Play Area

A children’s playground with a variety of equipment is located in the south west of the park adjacent to a large sealed car parking area accessed off Centennial Avenue.  Trees around the playground were planted in 2017 as part of the ‘trees for babies’ programme. 

 

PHOTO: Children’s playground and amenity area

 

3.6.3  BMX Track

The Alexandra BMX Club was formed in 2007 and is affiliated with BMX-NZ.  The original track, built by the Dunstan BMX Club, was rebuilt in 2011 by the Alexandra BMX Club to a design capable of hosting New Zealand national and regional competitions. A new start ramp was constructed in 2018 and the facilities are among the best in the South Island.

 

3.6.4  Bowling Club Complex

The Alexandra Bowling Club erected a pavilion in 1982 at Molyneux Park which has since been extended.  The club has two outdoor greens and one indoor rink, an equipment shed, and a parking area.

Petanque

The establishment of a petanque court to the south of the bowling green was approved by Council in 2020.  There is an agreement for petanque players to share use of the Bowling Club pavilion.

 

3.6.5  Central Arena

The Central arena of the Molyneux Park Sports area is fenced and surrounded by an embankment, which provides an excellent viewing area for spectators. The area is used during the winter season as the home ground of the Alexandra Rugby Football Club and is the venue for sub-union rugby matches.  A marked grass athletics track is used during the summer.  The Central Arena also has a first-class cricket wicket that was re-built in 2020.

The Central Arena has been used as a venue for public entertainment, athletics and other sporting events.  Facilities include the stadium building, two toilet blocks, changing rooms suitable for first class cricket, equipment storage shed, score boards and sightscreens for cricket. 

A custodian’s residence within the arena is generally leased on the condition that the resident is required to act as a caretaker and monitor security on the park. 

Sealed parking areas capable of accommodating approximately 160 vehicles are also provided near the arena and stadium building.

The ‘Queenstown Lakes-Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy’ notes that this is a major event facility particularly for cricket as it can host national level games.

 

3.6.6  Fulton Hogan Cycle Park and adjoining skatepark

A BMX track and skate park are located in the west of the park.  Fulton Hogan has naming rights over the cycle park as part of a memorandum of understanding. Fulton Hogan provides financial support towards maintenance of this area.

 

PHOTO Bike park? (trees for Babies here as well)

 

3.6.7  Ice Skating Rink

An outdoor Olympic sized (60m x 30m) ice skating rink and club house is sited in the South West corner of the park which is run by Ice Inline. An application to construct two curling rinks to be located to the west of the ice rink was approved by Council in 2020 and funding has been granted by Central Lakes Trust for the construction.

The rink’s refrigeration plant has recently been upgraded as part of an energy-sharing venture with the Alexandra Pool, which includes a heat transfer agreement. It is proposed that the ice-skating facility will be enclosed in the future.

 

PHOTO - Ice skating facility

 

3.6.8  Alexandra Pool

The Alexandra Pool is a council-run facility that was built in 2003 and includes a 25m indoor lap pool, a 13m therapeutic/learners’ pool, spa pool and an outdoor pool. Future extensions during the term of this plan may include a hydro slide and a gymnasium or other associated leisure areas. 

Various programmes are available at the pool, including aquafit, kayak polo, swimming lessons, holiday programmes and pool parties.

 

 

PHOTO Molyneux Aquatic Centre and carpark

 

3.6.9  Motor Caravan Parking Area

Council has approved that 6 car parks are available to members of the NZ Motor Caravan Association to park vehicles for a maximum of 3 nights.  This parking area is in the vicinity of the bike park and the pool.  This was started as a trial in 2007, and reportedly reduces night-time vandalism. 

Additional NZ Motor Caravan Association parking has been added on the unsealed parking area between Boundary Road (East) and the ice-skating rink, and a formal agreement will be established between parties to cover this area.

 

3.6.10 Netball/Tennis Facility

The Central Otago Netball Centre netball courts were established on Molyneux Park in the late 1980s, including nine courts, two of which have lighting.  Four courts have also been marked as tennis courts for dual use.  During the 1990s a two-level pavilion was developed in two stages. The centre is administered by an incorporated society affiliated with Netball Otago.

 

 

PHOTO: Central Otago Netball Centre

 

The courts are currently used mainly for netball related activities particularly during the winter months (April to September), with a regular Saturday competition as well as numerous team practices during the week.  Courts are used for social tennis and tennis coaching and other community activities over the warmer months. The pavilion can be hired out to community groups and businesses as well as being used for social functions.

 

3.6.11 North Eastern Sports Fields (Back Fields)

More than 5 hectares of land to the north of the Central Arena has been developed for multi-purpose sports fields. 

The fields are marked for winter codes including rugby and football.  During summer months this area is marked out with 3 cricket pitches and is also used for softball. 

Athletics have a long jump pit and throwing area (with net) adjacent to the Central Arena embankments.  There are also practice cricket nets located behind the stadium.

Lights have been installed to illuminate a practice sports field in this area.  Additional sportsfield lighting is also contemplated in this plan.

Adjacent grounds at Dunstan High School can be used in association with Molyneux Park when there is high demand such as school age rugby tournaments. 

3.6.12 Scout Hall

 

The Scout Association constructed a scout hall in the area beyond the cycle/skateboard park in 2002.

 

3.6.13 Squash Club

 

The Alexandra Squash Club Inc has established two squash courts and clubrooms within a leased area between the bowling club and the arena. Their leased areas include space for the construction of additional courts in the future. 

 

 

3.6.14 Stadium Building

The stadium was constructed in 1973 and is used by a variety of sports groups. It has been assessed as being earthquake prone and Council is considering redevelopment options.  

The Alexandra Rugby Football clubroom is attached on the arena side of the building and has its own external access. 

The stadium is also used for indoor displays and the Merino Fine Wool Shearing championships; however, the wooden gymnasium floor restricts usage for some events. The stadium kitchen is used by junior rugby on Saturdays during the rugby season.

Alexandra Basketball, the Alexandra Badminton Club and the Alexandra Gymnastics Club use the stadium year-round. 

The stadium includes two squash courts no longer in use since the Alexandra Squash Club relocated to its new facilities. The spaces are now leased to the Alexandra Rugby Club and an indoor rock climbing venture.

 

 

PHOTO of stadium

 

 

 

 

 


 

3.7      Proposed Facilities

3.7.1  Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy 2018

This strategy notes that ‘CODC has a major hub park at Molyneux Park with a large cluster of separate facilities that are not integrated including: Molyneux Stadium (indoor court), Molyneux Oval (cricket), Central Otago Netball Centre (courts and pavilion) plus sports fields and ice rinks and the Aquatic Centre’.

Recommendations in this strategy relevant to development of facilities at Molyneux Park include the following:

·      That Molyneux Park is designated as a ‘major hub park’ for sports activities

·      ‘That opportunities are explored to increase collaboration / partnerships at an operational level between existing community sport hub facilities’ and that a ‘multi-code sport partnership approach’ in all sport hubs to ‘generate economies in scale and aid long-term sustainability’.

·      Any new gym facilities should consider co-location within hubs such as Molyneux Stadium.

·      ‘Develop a new half-field turf area at Molyneux Park in the short to medium term with potential shared use of the Netball Pavilion to provide changing and toilets facilities for hockey users, part-size turf located so that a full-size field can be accommodated in the future’

 

3.7.2  The Molyneux Park - Redevelopment Options Study 2008

This study identified a series of options for enhancing the use of the park through strategic location and relocation of facilities including the following:

 

 

Notes / progress

Renovation of clay cricket wickets

 

Completed

Demolish existing stadium and replace with indoor sports hall beside skate park/sports hub

No community demand indicated for new stadium during 2020 plan update. Potential site is where NZMCA is located.

Relocate croquet to Molyneux Park

Croquet remains at Kenmare Street but site identified by Petanque Club.

Relocate netball/tennis facilities

Netball/tennis have decided not to relocate from their current position

Relocate ice skating rink to be adjacent to the swimming pool

Ice skating rink remains in the current position, however there is an energy sharing agreement between the ice rink and the pool

Create an avenue of trees along Boundary Road East

Trees have been planted along Boundary Road. 

Develop a new playground zone outside the swimming pool entrance

There are no plans to relocate the playground as the current site is considered more suitable.

 

 

3.7.3  Sports Fields

The Molyneux Park Reserve Management Plan includes a proposal to develop further sports fields in a new area west of the Netball courts this area will become part of the park, refer Figure 2 below. 

 

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Figure 2: 2013 proposal to develop sports fields

 

3.7.4  Hockey Field

In 2019 the Vincent Community Board agreed in principle to set aside an area of up to 7500 square metres in Molyneux Park for a hockey turf. 

The Molyneux Turf Incorporated originally proposed a full-sized field, warm up area and additional parking. To be located near the Netball courts to enable possible sharing of pavilion space. This location could compromise the development of future sports field development or expansion of the netball courts. Following public consultation a location closer to the pool will be the site for any future hockey turf. See plan 3 page 30 for location details.

 

3.7.5  Other

Several clubs may require new or upgraded sports field lights through the term of this plan. Such lights are permitted subject to compliance with other statutory requirements.

Council has a commitment with the Department of Conservation to fence the northern side of the Otago Central Rail Trail from the netball courts to the new subdivision. The purpose of the fence is to prevent vehicle access from Dunstan Road across the Otago Central Rail Trail into Molyneux Park.  The fence is to be installed at the same time as the residential subdivision post and rail fence and will prevent access to what is now an informal access point into the park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.0 Vision and Outcomes

4.1      Vision

Molyneux Park is managed and developed as the district’s premier sports venue and provides a wide range of sporting and recreation opportunities for the local and wider community.

4.2      Outcomes

1.         Molyneux Park is preserved in perpetuity for the welfare and enjoyment of the general public as well as providing amenity that enhances Alexandra.

 

2.         Development of the park acknowledges its premier sports hub status while also providing for the needs of the local community and having due regard to the public’s right to freedom of entry and access to the park.

 

3.         Recognition that recreational and sporting organisations, through occupation agreements provide a significant role in facilitating recreational and sporting uses of the park.

 

4.         The park's development has regard for the views of the present users as well as consideration of accommodating future trends and emerging activities.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHOTO of central area?

5.0 Objectives and Policies

 

5.1      Occupation Agreements

5.1.1  General

The term occupational agreement refers to any lease, licence, easement (including right-of-way and telecommunication agreement), exchange of letter, or other agreement reached between the Council and a person, organisation, or company that is occupying part of Molyneux Park (including below ground facilities).  Further details of these different agreements and policies follow. 

Council requires that leases are granted, both to satisfy statutory requirements and to clarify the responsibilities of Council and club, including for existing occupations.  Council’s powers to grant leases, licenses and easements over parks varies depending on the status of the park concerned and the rights transferred from the Crown, and any classification under the Reserves Act 1977.  Occupation agreements will be assessed under any current Council policies.

The multiple use of buildings and other facilities by sports and cultural bodies has financial and sustainability benefits. While the sub-letting and shared use of leased facilities to other sports bodies requires the approval of Council, it is generally actively encouraged. If a group seeking a new occupation agreement is able to demonstrate a willingness to share facilities, Council will look more favourably on an application. 

Any structures associated with occupation agreements including signs will require approval from Council as the landowner and may require building consent or other approvals.

This policy is to be read in conjunction with Section 5.3: Park Development.

 

Objectives

 

1.         To confirm the occupation of Molyneux Park for approved uses and facilities by the granting of occupation agreements.

2.         To ensure establishment costs are paid by the agreement holder

3.         To consider the use of Molyneux Park for network utilities only where utilities do not detract from the purposes or amenity of the park and no costs for these utilities are accrued to Council.

4.         To discourage permanent easements and limit timeframes for easements and rights-of-way agreements (e.g. linked to the life of the building or activity).  Applications will be assessed on an individual basis, with an intention that the park values will be reinstated at the completion of the agreement period. No private right-of-way agreements will be permitted.

5.         To ensure the occupation of the ‘custodian’s residence’ meets the requirement of the Reserves Act to have the resident take on a ranger role, which may be voluntary or renumerated.

6..        To encourage the sharing of existing facilities to prevent unnecessary duplication or expansion of facilities.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Applications for leases, licences and other occupations may be allowed on undeveloped areas if there are no adverse effects on park values.

2               Applications for licences will need to be made in writing.

3               All legal costs and agreement costs, as well as the costs of any formation and maintenance to the Council’s satisfaction shall be borne by the grantee.

 

5.1.2  Leases

The management requirements for recreation reserves in the Reserves Act 1977 emphasise the retention of open space and accountability to the public of park management.  On recreation reserves, leases must be drawn up subject to the relevant provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

Requirements differ for land held under other statutes including the Local Government Act.  Council, however, uses the provisions contained in the Reserves Act 1977 as a guide when leasing land not subject to the Reserves Act 1977 to ensure consistency among the various tenancies.  In most cases leases will be subject to Council’s leasing policies and standard lease conditions so that leases are consistent and easier to manage.

The leasing of public land restricts the type of activities that can be undertaken and usually limits use of the land by the general public.  Exclusive use of Molyneux Park has usually involved enclosure to protect the ground surfaces, facilities and equipment required by different groups, and this needs to be balanced against the needs and preferences of the wider community.  The wider effects of a lease on the park and surrounding area should be considered when assessing the suitability of an activity including hours of operation, transport requirements and car parking. 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Long term exclusive use will be subject to a lease if approved, and may be allowed where Council determines that the activity

·      Cannot or should not be located on other land outside the park

·      Provides for shared or multi-use where this is possible. 

·      Is in accordance with the objectives of this management plan and any other relevant Council documents; and

§ Satisfies the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977 or other statutes.

2               New Leases

                 Land may be leased to groups and organisations for the following purposes:

·      The construction of sports facilities and associated buildings at the group’s or organisation’s expense.

·      The construction of buildings and other structures that increase or improve the use of the Molyneux Park for recreation at the group’s or organisation’s expense.

Provided that:

·      There are enough other sportsgrounds, either existing or are about to be created in the locality, to meet the outdoor sporting needs of other groups and the general public.

·      The land is used for recreation or for activities that increase or improve the use of the Molyneux Park for recreation.

·      The proposed activities cannot satisfactorily take place in existing facilities.

3               For existing leases, any opportunities shall be taken to renegotiate existing leases in cases where they do not comply with the policies of this management plan or, in the case of land that is subject to the Reserves Act 1977, with the requirements of the Act.

4               Leases shall incorporate the appropriate provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, except where the Council’s tenure of the land requires otherwise and shall be consistent with this management plan and other Council documents.

5               Any new or renegotiated lease shall include:

·      A clause requiring that there will be no subletting of the leased land or of the building erected thereon without the prior approval of the Council.

·      A clause covering maintenance responsibilities of the lessor and lessee.

6               Hours of operation, ancillary activities, transport and car parking requirements of a potential lessee will be assessed when considering the suitability of a lease. 

7               The notification of proposed leases in this management plan shall serve as public notice for the purposes of the Reserves Act 1977.

8               Leases will be subject to a rental fee, except where Council has resolved that no or reduced rental is required. Rents for approved users (e.g. voluntary recreation facilities, approved community users) will be set at an agreed level.  Rents for commercial use will generally be based on ‘market value’. 

9.              The custodian’s house may be leased to a private individual on the condition that they act as a caretaker by monitoring activity on the park and notifying any security issues to the appropriate Council officer or the police as required.

 

 

5.1.3  Licences

A licence to occupy provides for the non-exclusive right to use a park for a specific purpose.

The Reserves Act 1977 permits the granting of licences including for communication stations.

Licensees may be charged a rental. Council may charge a rental other than a market rental for recreational or management purposes. 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Licences may be granted for communication stations and any works connected with the station, in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 where there are no adverse effects on park values.

 

5.1.4  Easements including for underground services

An easement lawfully grants the rights for one party to use another person’s land for a specified purpose, in this case the use of Molyneux Park for access or utility facilities.

Easements granted will generally have limited timeframes (e.g. linked to the life of the building or an activity) and an annual fee for rental may be required  Conditions regarding reinstatement of the site at the completion of the agreement period should also be included with any permission granted.  By not granting easements in perpetuity, and requiring reinstatement of the site, the values of the park will be re-established.

Easements for private underground or overground facilities can affect future development and will only be considered by Council where no other options are available, and establishment costs and rental may be charged after a market valuation. 

Where easements are approved, easement owners are responsible for maintaining utility facilities (stormwater/wastewater/sewerage/water and gas pipes/electrical/telecommunication cables) connecting between their property and the main network operator’s facilities including reinstatement of park land following work being carried out on facilities.

It is important for Council to know the location and ownership of private utility facilities crossing Molyneux Park so that their location can be taken into consideration when development enhancement or maintenance work is being planned or carried out on the park and for payment to be made for the use of this land.  As-built plans will generally be a requirement of an easement agreement.

 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Applications for pipes, cabling, discharge or drainage rights including applications for Council infrastructure must be made in writing and contain the following information:

·      A statement of alternative pipe location or discharge options and their costs;

·      Discussion on why these alternative options cannot be used;

·      Evidence that the pipes or discharge will not detract from the purpose of the park; and

·      A diagram of the proposed works and a survey.

2               An easement or formal agreement will be required for every pipe, cable, or discharge on Molyneux Park.

3               All legal costs and the costs of formation and maintenance to the Council’s satisfaction shall be borne by the grantee.

4               Payment for the benefit of a pipe, cable or drainage easement shall generally be made at market valuation.

5               Council will require those holding easements for services crossing Molyneux Park to meet the costs of maintaining the pipes or cables.

6               When services and utilities are no longer required, the service / utility owner shall remove them from the site and reinstate the park to Council’s satisfaction.  If this is not completed to Council’s satisfaction, any costs will be recovered from the services/utility owner.

7               No private access easements will be granted across any land covered by this

                 management plan.

 


 

5.2      Allocation of the park for sporting use and events

 

5.2.1  Temporary use

Use of Molyneux Park for an organised event requires prior approval of Council, usually allocated through Council’s park booking system via the Council website.

While events can enhance the public use and enjoyment of Molyneux Park and contribute to the diversity and vibrancy of the community, large numbers of people and activities can adversely affect the park and neighbours.  Council retains full discretion over the number and nature of any organised event on park land or in a Council owned or operated building or facility. 

 

Objectives

 

1          To manage the use of Molyneux Park for events and temporary use so that it is consistent with the values of the park.

 

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Events, social activities, functions and exhibitions may be allowed on Molyneux Park, where the adverse effects on other users or lessees, the park and park neighbours of such activities are minimised, and the proposal meets statutory and policy obligations.

2               Applications must be made in writing at least four weeks prior to the event.

3               Where temporary exclusive use is necessary for the holding of an event or activity, part or all of the park will be closed to the public for the duration of that event. 

4               Where part or all of Molyneux Park is to be closed to the public for event use, public notification of this will be made prior to the activity requiring the closure. Where closure is required by a body other than Council, that body will be responsible for meeting the cost of public notification.

5               A charge and / or bond may be levied for all forms of exclusive use.  The bond will be set as per Council’s Fees and Charges Schedule.

                 Bonds may be waived at the discretion of Council.

6               Event organisers are to reinstate the park to the same condition as before the event to the satisfaction of Council. 

 

 

5.2.1  Sports field bookings

Council uses a booking system for the use of the fields, changing rooms and for other park events.  It is expected that this will change to an online booking system during the term of this plan. 

Council’s provision and allocation of sports fields is determined by demand.  It is anticipated that demand will continue to increase over the life of this plan in response to population increase, development of new sports, extended playing seasons, and expectations of higher quality sports surfaces.  These trends will require Council to be increasingly creative in its management and allocation of sports fields. 

During peak use some conflict can occur between codes, and this is likely to increase as use of Molyneux Park increases. 

 

 

 

 

Objectives

 

1          To provide sports fields at Molyneux Park to meet local demand and provide for regional and national sporting events.

2          To balance requests to allocate sports fields bookings to meet demand where this can be achieved.

3          To configure sports fields to best utilise the space available to meet demand for all codes.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Council may invite the heads of the main sporting codes to an annual User Group meeting to discuss their requirements and options to manage these.  

2               Council will generally give priority to sports field bookings from regional or local heads of sports codes, and for in-season rather than out of season bookings.  Programming of other competitions, tournaments, exhibition matches or such like shall be by prior negotiation between the applicant and the Council, and application should be made in writing not less than two weeks prior to the event to allow this to take place.  

3               All bookings for social games shall be made direct to the appropriate sports codes who will levy the social users on a per game basis.  Any other social activities outside the main codes of hockey, football (soccer), rugby, cricket, netball and softball will be booked and charged by Council directly.

4               Council may change the configuration of sports fields to best utilise the space available. 

5               Heads of code shall be responsible for ensuring that all ground furnishings such as goals, goal posts, temporary seating, tents, booths, caravans, temporary fences, corner posts, signs and electrical services comply with all legislation and regulations, including health and safety legislation and the Building Act, and that goal posts are put up no earlier than 2 weeks before the commencement of the season and removed no later than 1 week after the last day of the season unless otherwise approved by Council.

 

 

5.2.2  Camping

The New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA) has an agreement with Council for its members with certified self-contained vehicles to park in the unformed carpark adjacent to the skate park area. 

During the life of this plan this area maybe required for recreational activities or facilities more in keeping with the principles of the Reserves Act, and Molyneux Parks as a designated regional sports hub. These activities or facilities will take precedent over camping.

Use of the park outside of usual hours can have positive effects including additional surveillance which can reduce vandalism.  Negative effects of camping elsewhere in the park can include damage to the park and facilities and public health concerns. 

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow camping to take place at Molyneux Park where this is associated with events and this is compatible with other park activities.

 

2          To allow members of the NZMCA to camp in specific areas in accordance with any agreements between the NZMCA and Council where this is compatible with other park activities.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council may approve camping associated with sporting and community events where there is evidence that the effects of camping will be adequately managed.  All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least four weeks before the event.  Applications will be considered on a case by case basis, and a bond will be required. The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions.

 

 

2               Members of the NZMCA may camp in designated areas of the park, subject to any formal agreement between the NZMCA and Council and the conditions contained therein.

 

 

 

5.2.3  Circuses and side-show operators

The Central Otago District Council occasionally receives requests from circuses, side-shows, gypsy fairs and similar operators for use of Molyneux Park. 

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow occasional use of Molyneux Park for circuses, side-shows and similar uses provided that this is compatible with other park activities.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council may approve circuses, side shows, gypsy fairs and like operations where there is evidence that the adverse effects can be minimised.  All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least four weeks before the event.  Applications will be considered on a case by case basis, and a bond will be required. The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions.

 

 

5.2.4  Fireworks displays

Groups occasionally wish to use Molyneux Park for fireworks displays.  These displays require the permission of Fire and Emergency NZ before proceeding, and adverse effects of fireworks displays on park values need to be minimised.

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow fireworks displays on Molyneux Park subject to all adverse effects on park values can be minimised.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Council may approve fireworks displays where there is evidence that the adverse effects of this use can be minimised.  All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least 10 working days before the event and Applications will be considered on a case by case basis, and a bond will be required.  Final approval will not be given by Council until required external permissions have been obtained including a FENZ permit. 

The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions

·      Public liability insurance.

 

 

2               Fireworks displays are only permitted within the Central Arena, and only if damage to the central cricket wicket can be avoided.

 

 

5.2.5  Alcohol licences

The selling of alcohol is often viewed by sports clubs as a means of raising funds for club activities however is only indirectly linked to the use of the park for sporting or recreational purposes. 

The consumption of alcohol on the park can have adverse effects on people using the park and park neighbours including noise and damage that may reduce the amenity of the park.

Approval is needed from Council as landowner of the park, and separately from Council for an alcohol licence.  Other approvals, including resource consent, may also be required.

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow the granting of alcohol licences over premises on Molyneux Park where the values of the park are not diminished and where the effects on other park users and park neighbours can be minimised.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council as landowner may support the granting of alcohol licences for premises located on Molyneux Park where the adverse effects of this use can be minimised.

All applications are to be in writing and forwarded to Council at least four weeks before the event.

 

The assessment of effects will include the following:

·      Whether the activity is consistent with the purposes of the park, i.e. whether it is ancillary to the principal sport and recreation purpose of the park.

·      Traffic and parking demand

·      Effects on others using the park and neighbours

·      Services

·      Damage to the park

·      Health and safety provisions including host responsibility provisions.

 

 

 

 

5.2.6  Commercial Use

 

Council may, from time to time, receive applications for the use of Molyneux Park for temporary or permanent commercial activities. These activities include filming, markets, coffee carts and commercial recreation ventures, amongst other commercial activities.

 

Commercial activities may be a legitimate part of the range of activities within parks where they relate to the purposes of the park.  Some commercial activities such as filming regional or national sporting events may be assessed as appropriate while not contributing to the public’s enjoyment of the park.  Such activities can promote Alexandra and educate people about the value of natural resources.

 

While commercial activities can be appropriate, they must not be allowed to detract from the primary purposes of the park.  Also, the activities should not adversely impact on the park, its use or users and park neighbours.  Controls on activities should ensure that the effects of activities are minimised.  All commercial activity is required to comply with Council bylaws and other relevant legislation.

 

Objectives

 

1          To ensure any permanent or temporary commercial use of Molyneux Park does not compromise the park’s values, adds to the public enjoyment of the park and is in accordance with the Reserves Act and relevant bylaw.

 

 

POLICIES

 

2               All applications to operate commercial activities on Molyneux Park shall be made to Council in writing.  Applications should include:

2.1     A description of the proposed activity;

2.2     A description identifying the places where the proposed activity will be carried out;

2.3     A description of the potential effects of the proposed activity, and any actions which the applicant proposes to minimise any adverse effects;

2.4     A statement of the proposed duration of the activity and the reasons for the proposed duration;

2.5     Relevant information relating to the applicant, including any information relevant to the applicant’s ability to carry out the proposed activity.

3               Temporary commercial activity applications need to be made at least ten working days       prior to the event.

4               Conditions necessary for the protection of values will be imposed on any permission for the commercial use of Molyneux Park.  Such conditions will also be sought on any resource consent application for the same activity.

5               A charge may be levied for the commercial use of Molyneux Park.

6               A bond maybe required for permanent and temporary commercial activities.

7               Compliance with the relevant conditions of the Resource Management, Building, Health and Safety in Employment Acts and other relevant Acts including the District Plan is the responsibility of the applicant.

 


 

5.3      Park Development

5.3.1  General

 

In addition to providing space for sport and recreation activities, parks provide wider benefits including amenity to the surrounding area and pedestrian connectivity.  Parks can provide important open space areas for all ages to play, whether that is through using natural features, or through the provision of formal playgrounds, skate parks or bike parks.  Park values may be reduced where buildings and other enclosed structures including fences prevent access and dominate the park. 

Community needs change, and sport and active recreation facilities need to be adaptable and flexible to meet the needs of a wider range of activities and users into the future.  The ‘Queenstown Lakes Central Otago Regional Sport & Recreation Facility Strategy’ supports a multi-code sport partnership approach to facility provision for economic and adaptive reasons, and for codes to co-locate when existing facilities need renewal. 

In a Sport New Zealand survey published in 2015, walking was the most popular sport and recreation activity, with 60% of adults participating over the past 12 months[2].  Walking activities, including dog walking, bring activity to parks outside of times where organised sport takes place which can improve surveillance and reduce vandalism.  Recreational walking can be encouraged by the construction of paths through the site and amenity improvements including tree planting.  Well-located paths will also support active transport to events or commuting options.

Recreation facilities such as the existing bike hub, skate park and playground also support greater use of the park throughout the week and are convenient for families attending sport events.

A significant number of both overhead and underground services are located on Molyneux Park and Boundary Road East, including water, irrigation, drainage, wastewater, power and tele-communications services.  The exact location of services needs to be determined prior to planning and building structures, and enquiries should be made to the service owner and Council.  The park includes protected heritage sites which may need to be located.

Most of the area of Molyneux Park is designated in the District Plan ‘for recreation purposes’ which reduces Resource Management Act approval requirements for recreation activities.

 

Plan 3: Proposed park development.

 

5.3.2  Buildings and structures

All buildings and structures including signs, temporary structures, lighting, fences and art will require approval from Council as the landowner and may require amendments to the lease including the clarification of maintenance.  They may also require building consent and other approvals. 

Any structures should be located where they allow for access within and through the park and should be designed to be compatible with the amenity of the park. 

Council will only provide amenity lighting for carparks and paths where there is a clear public benefit.  This will be limited to Council-owned facilities. and in accordance with Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CEPTD) principles.

Public art is one of the more visible and accessible forms of art, and if placed within a park is often complimentary to both the installation and the location. However public art can be controversial, and if located in the wrong place, may not support the primary purpose of the park. The location of any public art installation must be in keeping with the scale and values of the park, and it must not unduly impact on the cost or operation of recreation or maintenance activities

 

Objectives

 

1          To ensure that buildings and other structures do not dominate Molyneux Park and are located, designed and maintained so that they do not detract from the amenity of the park and facilitate public recreational use and enjoyment.

2          To support the development or redevelopment of buildings and structures on the park where the need for these has been fully assessed and it is demonstrated that recreation and community outcomes are better enabled.

3          To encourage sharing of existing facilities to prevent unnecessary duplication or expansion of facilities.

4          To ensure that buildings and structures have necessary approvals.

5          To encourage and allow for networks of paths for pedestrians and/or cyclists

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               The multiple use of buildings and other facilities by sports and recreation clubs shall be actively encouraged including subletting.  A new building will only be erected where it is not suitable to use a modified existing building, or possible to share facilities with other users.  Buildings shall be designed or modified for multi-purpose use where practicable.

2               New buildings on the park shall only be considered where:

·   they meet a specific proven need

·   Neither the location of the building, nor associated car-parking, unduly restrict the area useable for outdoor recreation or utilisation of the park.

·   They do not obstruct the entrances to the park, either physically or visually, including access for emergency vehicles.

·   They do not detract from the appearance or open nature of the park, especially as seen from surrounding roads.

3               All new buildings and structures shall be of a size and design that:

·   Is such that they provide no more than a service ancillary to the use of the area for sport.

·   Is to acceptable architectural standards.

·   Is in scale with, and suited to, the character of the park.

·   If possible, they shall be sited so that they can be extended to provide such further facilities as may be required later.

4               When assessing proposals for buildings and structures, Council’s assessment and discretion will include the following:

·       Location and size of building or structure

·       Proposed lighting

·       Materials and finishes

·       Servicing requirements

·       Associated provision for transport including carparking

·       Proposed signs including inward facing signs on fences

·       Proposed landscaping

·       Access and carparking.

 

 

5.3.3  Car parks

Car parks support recreational use by people who need to drive to the park including those travelling longer distances however, over-supply will encourage car use by those that have other options. 

Car parking areas reduce park land available for recreation and encourage access by vehicles.  The ‘Sport & Recreation Facility Development Guide’ published by Sport New Zealand in 2019 recommends that sustainable transport options are promoted for parks, and that cycleways and walkways are designed as part of the site plan to improve transport options.  Large areas of Alexandra are within a ten-minute walk from the park, and the Otago Central Rail Trail provides a readily accessible cycle link connecting Molyneux Park to central Alexandra.  Parking in the park and surrounding areas is needed for those who do not have other options including visitors for district wide sports events.

The location and design of parking areas should not be at the expense of areas useable for outdoor sports, although parking areas may also be useful for other activities. Parking should not be designed to meet peak parking times. 

 

 

Objective

 

1          To provide carparking to at a level to meet but not exceed necessary parking demand.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Permanent car parking areas will not exceed 10% of the total developed area of the park. 

 

 

5.3.4 Sports Field Lighting

 

Lighting enables use of sports fields over longer periods of time, thus spreading the wear and increasing the capacity of each lit sports field area.  Lighting of sports fields also enables increased recreation opportunity through allowing participation after hours during the working week. 

However, there may be negative impacts associated with sports lighting and the capital cost of installing lighting is significant.  All lighting installations must obtain all required consents.

 

Objectives

 

1          To allow lighting of sports fields provided that the adverse effects of lighting can be minimised.

 

 

POLICIES

 

 

1               Council may approve clubs installing sports lighting where there is evidence that the adverse effects of lighting can be minimised, subject to necessary consents being granted.

 

 

2               A condition of approval includes an agreement that Council may require the light owner to undertake regular safety audits of lighting structures, and that any defective items identified will be remedied to Council’s satisfaction by the light owner within three months of notification of the defect.

 

 

3               Council has the right to determine when lighting can and cannot be used in the best interests of protecting the playing surface.

 

 

4               Costs incurred for the operation of sports field lighting will be the responsibility of the owner of the lights.

 


 

5.3.5 Signs

Signs can play an important role in wayfinding and reinforcing a park’s identity and status.  Signs are also essential in aiding identification of hazards that visitors might be exposed to.  Some areas have important or special stories to tell and can be enhanced by the use of interpretive signage. 

The use of promotional or advertising signage is one way that organisations are able to raise income over and above levying their membership, however signs other than those inside club buildings that are not visible from public places are generally not appropriate. 

Inward facing signs on fences may be visible from the surrounding park area and will increase the fence being a visual barrier.  Signs must comply with any district plan requirements.

Section 5.3.2: Buildings and structures will also apply to the location of free-standing signs.

 

Objectives

 

1          To provide sufficient signs of a design appropriate to the park to facilitate public use and enjoyment of the outdoor recreational environment.

 

2        To control the display of club and sponsorship signs on Molyneux Park.

 

 

POLICIES

 

1               Signs shall be provided to give clear and positive guidance to assist public enjoyment of the park.

2               Generally, all signs and symbols on the park shall be of standard design and appropriately placed in their surroundings.

3               The number and size of signs in the park shall be kept to a minimum to avoid visual detraction from the amenity of the park.

4               The Council may provide interpretive information for areas of interest at Molyneux Park.

5               Where possible signs will be located on existing buildings and structures.

6               Clubroom signs are permitted not more than a total of three-square metres relating to the use of the site (i.e. not advertising signs).

8               Unless specifically approved by Council, advertising signage will not be allowed at Molyneux Park.

9               Where advertising signage is approved by Council, it will still be subject to obtaining a resource consent or sited where resource consent is not required. 

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix 1:  Reserve Management Plan process from Reserves Act

 

The following table summarises section 41 of the Reserves Act (1977) – Management Plans, and the process used to develop and revise a management plan.  When a plan is being revised the first 2 steps may not be repeated.

 

 

Relevant Sections of the Reserves Act

 

Public Consultation

 

Description of Activity

 

Phase

 

Section 41 (5)

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (5)c

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) a-c

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) d

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) d

 

Optional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mandatory

 

Council notifies the public that it is preparing a management plan and calls for submissions

(1 month)

ò

Public submissions are received and incorporated into a draft management plan

ò

A draft management plan is made available to the public for further comment (2 months)

ò

The draft management plan is edited to incorporate input from public submissions

ò

The final document is presented to Council for adoption

 

Not undertaken for this review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Planning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (6) e

 

 

 

 

 

Section 41

 

 

 

 

Section 41 (4)

 

 

Council adopts management plan

ò

All policies come into effect and are enforceable by Council

ò

The management plan is continually monitored and reviewed

 

Implementation

 

 


 

Appendix 2:  Information on Recreation Reserve parcels

Documents the land is held in:

 

·     GN 1904/2703 and 1958/711. Part Section 1 SO 24662- reserve, classified and vested in Council by NZ GN 1999/4370

·     CT9A/168-Section 13 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 1450m².

·     CT7C/315-Part Section 12 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 8000m².

·     GN1958 page 721-Part Section 12 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 4775m² (area derived from prior appellation being Sec 10, 4775m² as set out in this GN prior to reappellation of this section with other land to Section12.

·     GN1904 page 2704-Part Section 12 Blk XXXVII Tn of Alexandra, 13.4375ha. (Area by deduction of the above areas from the original area of Section 12)

 

Chronological Order of Status Actions

 

·      SO 14033 Town map of Alexandra – Defined Town Belt, Town of Alexandra.

·      GN 1904 page 2703 permanently reserved Town Belt for a Public park. (Registered as 5000607/1)

·      GN 1958 page 721 Section 10 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, added to the Alexandra Domain.

·      Reappellation Section 10 Block XXXVII and part Town Belt re-appellated to Section 12 Block XXXVII town of Alexandra, 14.860ha. Copy of re-appellation document not obtained but re-appellation is evidenced by the description in GN 1980-page 1497 below as “Section 12 Block XXVII Town of Alexandra (previously section 10 Block XXVII and part Town Belt).

·      CT7C/315 Issued for Part Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, 8000m². Note the balance of Section 12 is held in GN 1904 page 2704and GN 1958 page 721 (previously the part of Sec 12 in this GN being Sec 10).

·      GN 1980-page 1497 Classified Section 12 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, (Registered as 536202) for recreation purposes.

·      574823/1 re-appellated Part of Section 12 as section 13 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra, 1450m².

·      CT9A/168 Issued for Section 13 Block XXXVII Town of Alexandra

·      GN 1999-page 4370 Section 1 SO 24662 reserved, classified and vested in (Registered as 982000) Council as a recreation reserve.

·      Gazette 2004-page 1371/2. Vested Pt Sec 12 (that part in CT73/315) & Sec 13 in Council in trust for recreation purposes. DOC’s historical files suggested the land was vested in Council by Section 26A Reserves Act 1977 [on the 1980 classification of Sec 12 for recreation].

 

 


2 March 2021

 

21.2.3         Fees and Charges 2021-22 Schedule

Doc ID:      523359

 

1.       Purpose

 

To approve the draft fees and charges schedule for the Vincent Community Board and recommend that Council include these fees and charges in the 2021/31 Long-term Plan.

 

 

Recommendations

 

That the Vincent Community Board

A.      Receives the report and accepts the level of significance.

B.      Recommends to Council to accept the changes for the Vincent Ward to the Fees and Charges Schedule for 2021/22 as detailed and highlighted in Appendix 1.

C.      Recommends Council adopt the fees and charges related to the Vincent Ward as part of the Council’s annual fees and charges for the 2021/22 financial year.

 

2.       Background

 

Each year the fees and charges are reviewed by staff. Required changes are put to the relevant Community Board or Council. Approved changes are updated in the Fees and Charges Schedule, which in turn will be included in the current annual plan or long-term plan.

 

 

3.       Discussion

 

A review of the Fees and Charges Schedule has been completed, with a number of changes being identified for 2021/22 and detailed in Appendix 1. Once approved by the Community Board, the Fees and Charges Schedule will be updated and adopted as part of the long-term plan process for implementation from 1 July 2021.

 

The attached is a complete copy of the fees and charges schedule, with the highlighted area being specific for the Vincent Community Board.  There are no major increases to the Vincent schedule. 

 

 

4.       Options

 

Option 1 – (Recommended)

 

Accept the recommended changes to the Fees and Charges Schedule.

 

Advantages:

 

·        Allows changes to reflect current practices and cost recoveries.

·        May lead to additional revenue and/or reduced rate burden on the rate-payer.

 

Disadvantages:

 

·        Some members of the community may feel disadvantaged paying increased fees.

 

Option 2

 

Do not accept changes to the Fees and Charges Schedule.

 

Advantages:

 

·        Status quo remains and users of the services do not incur increased fees.

 

Disadvantages:

 

·        May not reflect a fair sharing of costs to the end user.

·        Loss in revenue or a greater reliance on the rate-payer.

 

 

5.       Compliance

 

Local Government Act 2002 Purpose Provisions

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities through oversight by the elected members, and forms part of long-term plans and annual plans.  

Financial implications – Is this decision consistent with proposed activities and budgets in long term plan/annual plan?

 

This is consistent with budgets and policies contained within long-term plans and annual plans as these fees and charges increase income and reduce the burden on the rate-payer.

 

Decision consistent with other Council plans and policies? Such as the District Plan, Economic Development Strategy etc.

 

Yes as the majority of fees and charges are identified as a source of income under the Revenue and Financing Policy, or the Development and Financial Contributions Policy. 

 

Considerations as to sustainability, the environment and climate change impacts

 

No considerations as to sustainability environment and climate change required.

 

Risks Analysis

 

This decision carries little to no risk to Council.

Significance, Consultation and Engagement (internal and external)

 

This report is not considered significant. The fees and charges schedule is included in the supporting document for the long-term plan consultation document and public awareness will be raise via this mechanism.

 

 

 

6.       Next Steps

 

A complete schedule of the fees and charges will be submitted to each of the relevant community boards for approval.  Once approved, the total suite of fees and charges will be presented to Council with the recommendation that Council adopt the proposed fees and charges as part of the adoption process when adopting the 2021/31 Long-term Plan.

 

 

7.       Attachments

 

Appendix 1 - Fees and Charges - VCB.pdf  

 

Report author:

Reviewed and authorised by:

 

 

Jotham Kasibante

Leanne Macdonald

Finance Manager

Executive Manager - Corporate Services

10/02/2021

11/02/2021

 


Vincent Community Board meeting

2 March 2021

 

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2 March 2021

 

6                 Reports for Information

21.2.4         Vincent Financial Report - Period Ending 31 December 2020

Doc ID:      522188

 

1.       Purpose

 

To consider the financial performance overview as at 31 December 2020.

 

Recommendations

That the report be received.

 

 

2.       Background

 

The operating statement for the six months ending 31 December 2020 shows a favourable variance of $301k against the revised budget.

 

 

AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2020

 

2020/21

2020/21

 

YTD

YTD

YTD

 

 

Full Year

 

 

Revised

 

 

Annual

Revised

 

Actual

Budget

Variance

 

Plan

Budget

 

$000

$000

$000

 

$000

$000

Income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

User Fees & Other

384

441

(58)

˜

1,030

875

Other Capital Contributions

171

-

171

˜

72

-

Rates

1,645

1,645

-

˜

2,911

3,115

Reserves Contributions

31

-

31

˜

-

-

Internal Interest Revenue

45

45

-

˜

180

92

Total Income

2,275

2,131

144

˜

4,193

4,082

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rates Expense

77

36

(41)

˜

61

71

Grants

89

52

(37)

˜

198

158

Other Costs

150

170

20

˜

365

340

Cost Allocations

400

403

2

˜

680

796

Administrative Expenses

87

105

18

˜

110

112

Staff

369

457

88

˜

818

915

Fuel & Energy

119

116

(3)

˜

235

233

Contracts

317

346

29

˜

573

621

Building Repairs and Mtce

97

119

22

˜

240

236

Professional Fees

30

64

34

˜

25

124

Internal Interest Expense

28

45

17

˜

120

91

Members Remuneration

15

23

8

˜

45

46

Depreciation

317

317

-

˜

814

632

Total Expenses

2,096

2,254

157

˜

4,284

4,375